Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility Skip to content

Din & Daf: Negligence & Responsibility

Din & Daf: Conceptual Analysis of Halakha Through Case Study with Dr. Elana Stein Hain

Negligence, followed by unavoidable interference: Who’s at fault?

Dr. Elana Stein Hain – dinanddaf@hadran.org.il

Printable source sheet

Bava Metzia 36a-b discusses the concept of תחילתו בפשיעה וסופו באונס, damage that resulted from a process that began with negligence but most immediately was caused by unavoidable interference. Should the person who was negligent originally be liable for compensation, does the unavoidability of the immediate cause of the damage change the equation of guilt? This is a great test case for considerations of responsibility!

Available as a podcast or video shiur:

Listen here:

Watch here:

 

Sources:

בבא מציעא לו:

אִתְּמַר: פָּשַׁע בָּהּ וְיָצָאת לַאֲגַם, וּמֵתָה כְּדַרְכָּהּ. אַבָּיֵי מִשְּׁמֵיהּ דְּרַבָּה אָמַר: חַיָּיב, רָבָא מִשְּׁמֵיהּ דְּרַבָּה אָמַר: פָּטוּר. 

 

It was stated that there is an amoraic dispute: In the case of one who was negligent in safeguarding an animal, and it went into a marsh, where it was susceptible to thieves and predatory animals, but it died in its typical manner despite this negligence, i.e., it was neither stolen nor devoured, Abaye says in the name of Rabba: The bailee is liable to pay. Rava says in the name of Rabba: The bailee is exempt from doing so.

 

אַבָּיֵי מִשְּׁמֵיהּ דְּרַבָּה אָמַר: חַיָּיב, כׇּל דַּיָּינָא דְּלָא דָּאֵין כִּי הַאי דִּינָא לָאו דַּיָּינָא הוּא. לָא מִבַּעְיָא לְמַאן דְּאָמַר תְּחִילָּתוֹ בִּפְשִׁיעָה וְסוֹפוֹ בְּאוֹנֶס חַיָּיב, דְּחַיָּיב. אֶלָּא אֲפִילּוּ לְמַאן דְּאָמַר פָּטוּר, הָכָא חַיָּיב. מַאי טַעְמָא? דְּאָמְרִינַן: הַבְלָא דְאַגְמָא קַטְלַהּ. 

The Gemara elaborates. Abaye said in the name of Rabba: He is liable to pay, and any judge who does not rule in accordance with this halakha is not a judge. It is not necessary to say that the bailee is liable in this case, according to the one who says: In a case where the incident was initially through negligence and ultimately by accident, one is liable to pay. According to this opinion, it is obvious that the bailee is liable to pay. But even according to the one who says: If the incident was initially through negligence and ultimately by accident one is exempt, here the bailee is still liable to pay. What is the reason that he is liable? It is because we say: The air of the marsh killed the animal. The negligence led to the death of the animal, and it was not due to circumstances beyond his control.

 

רָבָא מִשְּׁמֵיהּ דְּרַבָּה אָמַר: פָּטוּר, כֹּל דַּיָּינָא דְּלָא דָּאֵין כִּי הַאי דִּינָא לָאו דַּיָּינָא הוּא. לָא מִיבַּעְיָא לְמַאן דְּאָמַר תְּחִילָּתוֹ בִּפְשִׁיעָה וְסוֹפוֹ בְּאוֹנֶס פָּטוּר, דְּפָטוּר, אֶלָּא אֲפִילּוּ לְמַאן דְּאָמַר חַיָּיב, הָכָא פָּטוּר. מַאי טַעְמָא? דְּאָמְרִינַן: מַלְאַךְ הַמָּוֶת 

מָה לִי הָכָא וּמָה לִי הָתָם.

Rava says in the name of Rabba: He is exempt, and any judge who does not rule in accordance with this halakha is not a judge. It is not necessary to say that the bailee is exempt in this case, according to the one who says: In a case where the incident was initially through negligence and ultimately by accident, one is exempt from payment. According to this opinion, it is obvious that the bailee is exempt. But even according to the one who says: In a case where the incident was initially through negligence and ultimately by accident, one is liable to pay, here the bailee is still exempt from payment. What is the reason that he is exempt? It is because we say with regard to the Angel of Death, who causes death by natural causes: What difference is there to me if the animal was here, and what difference is there to me if the animal was there? The cause of the animal’s death was natural, and there is no relevance given to the location of the death. Consequently, the bailee is exempt.

 

וּמוֹדֵי אַבָּיֵי, דְּאִי הֲדַרָא לְבֵי מָרַהּ וּמִתָה – דְּפָטוּר. מַאי טַעְמָא? דְּהָא הֲדַרָא לַהּ וְלֵיכָּא לְמֵימַר הַבְלָא דְּאַגְמָא קַטְלַהּ. 

וּמוֹדֵי רָבָא כֹּל הֵיכָא דְּאִי גַּנְבַהּ גַּנָּב בַּאֲגַם וּמֵתָה כְּדַרְכָּהּ בֵּי גַנָּב – דְּחַיָּיב. מַאי טַעְמָא? דְּאִי שַׁבְקַהּ מַלְאַךְ הַמָּוֶת בְּבֵיתֵיהּ דְּגַנָּבָא הֲוָה קָיְימָא

The Gemara notes: And Abaye concedes that if the animal returned from the marsh to its owner’s house and died there that the bailee is exempt. What is the reason that he is exempt? He is exempt due to the fact that the animal returned, and since it was able to return there is no justification to say that the air of the marsh killed it. And Rava concedes that anytime the animal was stolen from the marsh and then dies in its typical manner in the house of the thief that the bailee is liable to pay. What is the reason that he is liable to pay? He is liable because even if the Angel of Death spared the life of the animal, it would be standing in the house of the thief due to the negligence of the bailee.

 

בבא מציעא צג:

אֵיתִיבֵיהּ רוֹעֶה שֶׁהָיָה רוֹעֶה וְהִנִּיחַ עֶדְרוֹ וּבָא לָעִיר בָּא זְאֵב וְטָרַף וּבָא אֲרִי וְדָרַס אֵין אוֹמְרִים אִילּוּ הָיָה שָׁם הָיָה מַצִּיל אֶלָּא אוֹמְדִין אוֹתוֹ אִם יָכוֹל לְהַצִּיל חַיָּיב אִם לָאו פָּטוּר

Abaye raised an objection to Rabba from another baraita: With regard to a shepherd who was herding the animals of others, and he left his flock and came to the town, if in the meantime a wolf came and tore an animal to pieces, or a lion came and trampled one of his flock, we do not say definitively that had he been there he would have rescued them and therefore he is liable due to his absence. Rather, the court estimates with regard to him: If he could have rescued his animal by chasing a beast of this kind away, he is liable, as his departure from the scene was certainly a contributing factor to the damage. If not, he is exempt from liability.

 

מַאי לָאו דְּעָל בְּעִידָּנָא דְּעָיְילִי אִינָשֵׁי לָא דְּעָל בְּעִידָּנָא דְּלָא עָיְילִי אִינָשֵׁי אִי הָכִי אַמַּאי פָּטוּר תְּחִילָּתוֹ בִּפְשִׁיעָה וְסוֹפוֹ בְּאוֹנֶס חַיָּיב

Abaye continues: What, is this baraita not referring to a case when the shepherd enters the town at a time when other people usually enter? If so, it presents a difficulty to the opinion of Rabba. Rabba responds: No, it is speaking of one who enters at a time when other people do not usually enter. Abaye retorts: If so, why is he exempt even if he could not have rescued the animal? This is a mishap that came about initially through negligence and ultimately by accident, and in a case of this kind he is liable due to his negligence.

 

רי”ף בבא מציעא כ. (בדפי הרי”ף)

דשמעינן מינה דהיכא דתחלתו בפשיעה אפילו איתניס שלא מחמת פשיעה חייב ההוא מימרא דאביי ורבה הוא

We learn from this that where the process begins with negligence, even if the no-fault force was not a result of the negligence, the bailee is liable. And this is a statement fo Abaye and Rava.

 

רמב”ם הל’ שכירות ג:ח

רוֹעֶה שֶׁהִנִּיחַ עֶדְרוֹ וּבָא לָעִיר בֵּין בְּעֵת שֶׁדֶּרֶךְ הָרוֹעִים לְהִכָּנֵס וּבֵין בְּעֵת שֶׁאֵין דֶּרֶךְ הָרוֹעִים לְהִכָּנֵס וּבָאוּ זְאֵבִים וּטְרָפוֹ אֲרִי וְדָרַס אֵין אוֹמְרִים אִלּוּ הָיָה שָׁם הָיָה מַצִּיל אֶלָּא אוֹמְדִין אוֹתוֹ אִם יָכוֹל לְהַצִּיל עַל יְדֵי רוֹעִים וּמַקְלוֹת חַיָּב וְאִם לָאו פָּטוּר וְאִם אֵין הַדָּבָר יָדוּעַ חַיָּב לְשַׁלֵּם:

The following laws apply when a shepherd abandoned his herd and came to the city – whether at the time the shepherds usually come to the city or at a time when this is not their practice – and wolves came and preyed upon the herd, or lions came and attacked them. We do not postulate that if he had been there, he definitely could have saved the animals. Instead, we assess the situation. If he could have saved them – even by hiring other shepherds and staves – he is liable. If not, he is not liable. If it is impossible to make such an assessment, he is liable.

 

בבא קמא נו.

נִפְרְצָה בַּלַּיְלָה אוֹ שֶׁפְּרָצוּהָ לִסְטִים כּוּ׳. אָמַר רַבָּה: וְהוּא שֶׁחָתְרָה.

The mishna teaches: If the pen was breached at night, or bandits breached it, and sheep subsequently went out and caused damage, the owner of the sheep is exempt. Rabba says: And this first instance of a pen that was breached is referring specifically to a case where the animal tunneled under the wall of the pen and by doing so caused the wall to collapse. In that case, the owner is completely blameless and therefore exempt from liability for any damage that ensues.

 

אֲבָל לֹא חָתְרָה מַאי, חַיָּיב?! הֵיכִי דָמֵי? אִילֵּימָא בְּכוֹתֶל בָּרִיא – כִּי לֹא חָתְרָה אַמַּאי חַיָּיב? מַאי הֲוָה לֵיהּ לְמֶעְבַּד? אֶלָּא בְּכוֹתֶל רָעוּעַ – כִּי חָתְרָה אַמַּאי פָּטוּר? תְּחִלָּתוֹ בִּפְשִׁיעָה וְסוֹפוֹ בְּאוֹנֶס הוּא!

The Gemara asks: But if the animal did not tunnel under the wall, what is the halakha? Would the owner be liable? What are the circumstances? If we say that the pen had a stable wall, then even if the animal did not tunnel, why is the owner liable? What should he have done? Clearly, he cannot be held liable for the damage. Rather, the pen had an unstable wall. The Gemara asks: Even if the animal tunneled under the wall and knocked it down, why is he exempt? The damage in this case is initially through negligence and ultimately by accident.

 

ר’ אשר וייס קובץ דרכי הוראה חלק ח סימן ה

והנראה עיקר בסוגיא גדולה זו דיסוד דינא דתחילתו בפשיעה חייב הוא משום דעל ידי הפשיעה בתחילתו פקע פטור האונס בסוף, ואין הטעם משום דהכל נחשב פשיעה חדא או משום דפשיעה ראשונה בעצם מחייבת, אלא הטעם דמכיון דמתחילה היה פשיעה אין האונס פוטר. והביאור בזה נראה דהרי כל מה שבאונס רחמנא פטריה הוא משום ד”מאי הוי ליה למיעבד” ואם כן השתא שפשע אי אפשר לומר כבר מאי הוי ליה למיעבד…

 

ונראה בדברינו לבאר איך מהני דין תחילתו בפשיעה בנזקי ממון דשם אי אפשר לומר דהפשיעה ראשונה הוי המחייב וכנ”ל אבל לפי דברינו באמת אין לומר שיש פשיעה המחייבת מיד אלא דע”י הפשיעה בתחילתו פקע פטור אונס בסוף וזה מתיישב גם בנזקי ממון דע”י שפשע בשורו שוב אין בו פטור אונס.

 

שנת תשע”א | שבת ויקהל

חמדת משפט: שומרים על ההובלה 3

הרב משה ארנרייך, אב”ד ארץ חמדה-גזית

https://www.eretzhemdah.org/newsletterArticle.asp?lang=he&pageid=48&cat=1&newsletter=955&article=3658

המקרה

משפחת בורנשטיין, הזמינה הובלת דירה מטבריה לחיפה, מ”מוביל הכל”.  כיוון שמדובר היה בכמות גדולה של חפצים, סוכם על העברת המטלטלין על ידי משאית ונגרר בעלי נפח דומה.

הנגרר הועמס ציוד בכמות גבוהה מזו המותרת על פי הרישוי ממשרד התחבורה לשימוש במרכב של נגרר זה. הרישוי של הנגרר הוא ל-2 טון. להערכת רמי הועמס עליו כ-2.5-3 טון.

לאחר כחצי שעה של נסיעה, עלה עשן מעומק הנגרר. העשן הזה התפתח במהרה לשרפה וניסיונות הכיבוי לא צלחו. רוב מוחלט של תכולת הנגרר נשרף או ניזוק באופן המוציא אותו משימוש.

תכולת המכולה לא הייתה מבוטחת על ידי התובעים או הנתבע.

משפחת בורנשטיין, דורשת מ”מוביל הכל”, פיצוי על החפצים שנשרפו.

 

…תחילתו בפשיעה וסופו באונס: כפי שהבהיר בית הדין, אומנם לא נמצאה פשיעה ביחס לאפשרות השריפה, אך נמצאה פשיעה (=התרשלות) בכך שהנגרר הועמס בעומס יתר, וזו פשיעה שיכולה היתה לגרום לנזק אחר של תאונה. מצב זה נחשב “תחילתו בפשיעה וסופו באונס” – שכן “מוביל הכל” פשע ביחס לאפשרות תאונה, אך סיכון זה לא התממש, אבל התממש סיכון אחר – שריפה.

 

לא ניתן לחייב יותר מן הפשיעה. מדברי התוספות (ב”ק כג. ד”ה סתם דלתות) במסכת בבא קמא עולה שאם הפשיעה היתה לגבי נזק של חפץ מסוים, אין להטיל על הפושע נזקים שקרו באונס בחפצים אחרים. ובנוסף, גם באותם חפצים עצמם, אם היקף הנזק הצפוי היה מוגבל, אין לחייב מדין תחילתו בפשיעה בנזק גדול יותר שאירע לאותם חפצים5.

כך גם נותנת הסברא, ונביא לדבר דוגמא: אדם נוסע במכונית אותה שכר למקום שבו היתה המכונית עלולה להישרט קלות. באופן מפתיע נפל סלע על המכונית, וגרם לפגיעה חמורה, האם מסתבר לחייב את השוכר בכל דמי הנזק? אלא שמסתבר שפשיעה יוצרת מעמד של פושע על כל פעולה, רק ביחס לשווי שפשע השומר בו. במקרה שלנו בגדים וספרים, בפשיעה – תאונה, חלקם לא היה נזוק ובשרפה – באונס, כולם נשרפו.

 

Dr. Elana Stein Hain is the Rosh Beit Midrash and a senior research fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America. Passionate about bringing Torah into conversation with contemporary life, she teaches Talmud from the Balcony, an occasional learning seminar exposing the big ideas, questions, and issues motivating Talmudic discussions; she authored Circumventing the Law: Rabbinic Perspectives on Legal Loopholes and Integrity (available at 50% off today with promo code FOUNDERSDAY24) which uses halakhic loopholes as a lens for understanding rabbinic views on law and ethics; and she co-hosts For Heaven’s Sake, a bi-weekly podcast with Donniel Hartman and Yossi Klein Halevi, exploring contemporary issues related to Israel and the Jewish world. Elana has also started TEXTing; a podcast where she and guest scholars study Torah texts that engage issues of the moment for the Jewish world. She lives in Manhattan with her beloved family.

 


Hadran’s Beyond the Daf shiurim are also available by podcast on

Spotify

Apple Podcasts 

YouTube

Beyond the Daf is where you will discover enlightening shiurim led by remarkable women, delving deep into the intricacies of Talmudic teachings, and exploring relevant and thought-provoking topics that arise from the Daf.

Dr. Elana Stein Hain

Dr. Elana Stein Hain is the Rosh Beit Midrash and a senior research fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America. Passionate about bringing Torah into conversation with contemporary life, she teaches Talmud from the Balcony, an occasional learning seminar exposing the big ideas, questions, and issues motivating talmudic discussions; she authored Circumventing the Law: Rabbinic Perspectives on Legal Loopholes and Integrity (pre-order discount code: PENN-ESHAIN30) which uses halakhic loopholes as a lens for understanding rabbinic views on law and ethics; and she co-hosts For Heaven’s Sake, a bi-weekly podcast with Donniel Hartman and Yossi Klein Halevi, exploring contemporary issues related to Israel and the Jewish world. In mid-January, Elana will be starting a new podcast called TEXTing, where she and guest scholars study Torah texts that engage issues of the moment for the Jewish world. She lives in Manhattan with her beloved family.
Scroll To Top