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Daf Yomi

May 18, 2021 | ื–ืณ ื‘ืกื™ื•ืŸ ืชืฉืคืดื

Masechet Yoma is sponsored by Vicky Harari in commemoration of her father's Yahrzeit, Avraham Baruch Hacohen ben Zeev Eliyahu Eckstein z'l, a Holocaust survivor and a feminist before it was fashionable. And in gratitude to Michelle Cohen Farber for revolutionizing women's learning worldwide.

This month's shiurim are sponsored by Josh Sussman in honor of both his wife, Romiโ€™s 50th birthday and son, Zeli. "He will, Bโ€™Ezrat HaShem, be making his first solo siyum on Masechet Yoma at his Bar Mitzvah in July".

And for a refuah shleima for Pesha Etel bat Sarah.

Yoma 37

Today’s daf is sponsored by Michelle and Laurence Berkowitz in memory of Joy Rochwarger Balsam z”l on her 17th yahrzeit, Joy was a pioneer in women’s learning and taught many students in many parts of the world. Joy wanted to teach Torah to anybody who wanted to learn, from Poland to Russia to her many students from Midreshet Moriah. Joy would have been so proud of Hadran Daf Yomi and Rabbanit Farber and to all else involved in this great endeavor. Because as Joy did, Hadran spreads Torah to anybody who wants to learn anywhere. Joy was immensely involved in all that went on in Israel as she lived here for many years. During these difficult times, may Joy’s neshama be a Meilitzat Yosher to bring peace and security to the people of Israel in the State of Israel.

The gemara explains the language of the confession on the bull – why is the word ‘ana’ (please) used and why is God’s name mentioned? Where did the kohen stand when he did the lottery on the goats? Who stood beside him? In what formation did they stand? The mishna describes different people who designed beautiful or more useful items for the Temple. What were they and who was credited with each one?

ื•ืžื ื™ืŸ ืฉื‘ืื ื ื ืืžืจ ื›ืืŸ ื›ืคืจื” ื•ื ืืžืจ ืœื”ืœืŸ ื‘ื—ื•ืจื‘ ื›ืคืจื” ืžื” ืœื”ืœืŸ ื‘ืื ื ืืฃ ื›ืืŸ ื‘ืื ื ื•ืžื ื™ืŸ ืฉื‘ืฉื ื ืืžืจ ื›ืืŸ ื›ืคืจื” ื•ื ืืžืจื” ื‘ืขื’ืœื” ืขืจื•ืคื” ื›ืคืจื” ืžื” ืœื”ืœืŸ ื‘ืฉื ืืฃ ื›ืืŸ ื‘ืฉื


And from where is it derived that the confession must begin with the word please? It is stated here: Atonement, and it is stated there, just before Mosesโ€™s plea following the sin of the Golden Calf at Horeb: โ€œPerhaps I may secure atonement for your sinโ€ (Exodus 32:30). Just as there, the prayer includes: โ€œPlease, this people is guilty of a great sinโ€ (Exodus 32:31), so too here, the term please should be used. And from where is it derived that the Yom Kippur confession includes the name of God? It is stated here: Atonement, and it is stated with regard to the heifer whose neck is broken: โ€œAtone, O God, for Your nation of Israel whom You redeemed, and do not let guilt for the blood of the innocent remain among Your people Israel, and they will be atoned of bloodguiltโ€ (Deuteronomy 21:8). Just as there, with regard to the heifer, the name of God is mentioned, so too here, the name of God is mentioned.


ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ื‘ืฉืœืžื ื—ื•ืจื‘ ืžืขื’ืœื” ืขืจื•ืคื” ืœื ื™ืœื™ืฃ ืžืื™ ื“ื”ื•ื” ื”ื•ื” ืืœื ืขื’ืœื” ืขืจื•ืคื” ืชื™ืœื™ืฃ ืžื—ื•ืจื‘ ื•ื›ื™ ืชื™ืžื ื”ื›ื™ ื ืžื™ ื•ื”ืชื ืŸ ื”ื›ื”ื ื™ื ืื•ืžืจื™ื ื›ืคืจ ืœืขืžืš ื™ืฉืจืืœ ื•ืื™ืœื• ื‘ืื ื ืœื ืงื ืืžืจ ืงืฉื™ื


Abaye said: Granted, the obligation to include the name of God in the confession at Horeb cannot be derived from the heifer whose neck is broken, since what was, was. The sin of the Golden Calf predated the mitzva of the heifer. However, you should derive that the confession in the ritual of the heifer whose neck is broken requires use of the term: Please, from Horeb, where Moses employed that term. And if you say that is so, and the term: Please, should be employed, didnโ€™t we learn in a mishna that the priests say: โ€œAtone, O God, for Your nation, Israelโ€ (Deuteronomy 21:8), while the mishna does not state the term please. Apparently, the formula of confession during the ritual of the heifer is not derived from Horeb. The Gemara says: It is indeed difficult why that is not derived.


ื•ื”ืŸ ืขื•ื ื™ืŸ ืื—ืจื™ื• ืชื ื™ื ืจื‘ื™ ืื•ืžืจ ื›ื™ ืฉื ื”ืณ ืืงืจื ื”ื‘ื• ื’ื•ื“ืœ ืœืืœื”ื™ื ื• ืืžืจ ืœื”ื ืžืฉื” ืœื™ืฉืจืืœ ื‘ืฉืขื” ืฉืื ื™ ืžื–ื›ื™ืจ ืฉืžื• ืฉืœ ื”ืงื“ื•ืฉ ื‘ืจื•ืš ื”ื•ื ืืชื ื”ื‘ื• ื’ื•ื“ืœ ื—ื ื ื™ื” ื‘ืŸ ืื—ื™ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ืฉืข ืื•ืžืจ ื–ื›ืจ ืฆื“ื™ืง ืœื‘ืจื›ื” ืืžืจ ืœื”ื ื ื‘ื™ื ืœื™ืฉืจืืœ ื‘ืฉืขื” ืฉืื ื™ ืžื–ื›ื™ืจ ืฆื“ื™ืง ืขื•ืœืžื™ื ืืชื ืชื ื• ื‘ืจื›ื”


ยง The mishna continues: And the priests and the people who were in the courtyard respond after he recites the name of God: Blessed be the name of His glorious kingdom forever and all time. It was taught in a baraita that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi says the following with regard to the verse: โ€œWhen I call out the name of the Lord, give glory to our Godโ€ (Deuteronomy 32:3). Moses said to the Jewish people: When I mention the name of the Holy One, Blessed be He, you give Him glory and recite praises in his honor. แธคananya, son of the brother of Rabbi Yehoshua, says that proof for the practice is from a different source: โ€œThe memory of the righteous shall be for a blessingโ€ (Proverbs 10:7). The prophet, Solomon, said to the Jewish people: When I mention the Righteous One of all worlds, you accord Him a blessing.


ืžืชื ื™ืณ ื‘ื ืœื• ืœืžื–ืจื— ื”ืขื–ืจื” ืœืฆืคื•ืŸ ื”ืžื–ื‘ื— ื”ืกื’ืŸ ืžื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืืฉ ื‘ื™ืช ืื‘ ืžืฉืžืืœื• ื•ืฉื ืฉื ื™ ืฉืขื™ืจื™ื ื•ืงืœืคื™ ื”ื™ืชื” ืฉื ื•ื‘ื” ืฉื ื™ ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืฉืœ ืืฉื›ืจื•ืข ื”ื™ื• ื•ืขืฉืืŸ ื‘ืŸ ื’ืžืœื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื•ื”ื™ื• ืžื–ื›ื™ืจื™ื ืื•ืชื• ืœืฉื‘ื—


MISHNA: The priest then came to the eastern side of the Temple courtyard, farthest from the Holy of Holies, to the north of the altar. The deputy was to his right, and the head of the patrilineal family belonging to the priestly watch that was assigned to serve in the Temple that week was to his left. And they arranged two goats there, and there was a lottery receptacle there, and in it were two lots. These were originally made of boxwood, and the High Priest Yehoshua ben Gamla fashioned them of gold, and the people would mention him favorably for what he did.


ื‘ืŸ ืงื˜ื™ืŸ ืขืฉื” ืฉื ื™ื ืขืฉืจ ื“ื“ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ืฉืœื ื”ื™ื” ืœื• ืืœื ืฉื ื™ื ื•ืืฃ ื”ื•ื ืขืฉื” ืžื•ื›ื ื™ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ืฉืœื ื™ื”ื™ื• ืžื™ืžื™ื• ื ืคืกืœื™ืŸ ื‘ืœื™ื ื”


Since the mishna mentions an item designed to enhance the Temple service, it also lists other such items: The High Priest ben Katin made twelve spigots for the basin so that several priests could sanctify their hands and feet at once, as previously the basin had only two. He also made a machine [mukheni] for sinking the basin into flowing water during the night so that its water would not be disqualified by remaining overnight. Had the water remained in the basin overnight, it would have been necessary to pour it out the following morning. By immersing the basin in flowing water, the water inside remained fit for use the next morning.


ืžื•ื ื‘ื– ื”ืžืœืš ื”ื™ื” ืขื•ืฉื” ื›ืœ ื™ื“ื•ืช ื”ื›ืœื™ื ืฉืœ ื™ื•ื ื”ื›ืคื•ืจื™ื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื”ื™ืœื ื™ ืืžื• ืขืฉืชื” ื ื‘ืจืฉืช ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ืขืœ ืคืชื— ื”ื™ื›ืœ ื•ืืฃ ื”ื™ื ืขืฉืชื” ื˜ื‘ืœื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ืฉืคืจืฉืช ืกื•ื˜ื” ื›ืชื•ื‘ื” ืขืœื™ื” ื ืงื ื•ืจ ื ืขืฉื• ื ืกื™ื ืœื“ืœืชื•ืชื™ื• ื•ื”ื™ื• ืžื–ื›ื™ืจื™ืŸ ืื•ืชืŸ ืœืฉื‘ื—


King Munbaz would contribute the funds required to make the handles of all the Yom Kippur vessels of gold. Queen Helene, his mother, fashioned a decorative gold chandelier above the entrance of the Sanctuary. She also fashioned a golden tablet [tavla] on which the Torah portion relating to sota was written. The tablet could be utilized to copy this Torah portion, so that a Torah scroll need not be taken out for that purpose. With regard to Nicanor, miracles were performed to his doors, the doors in the gate of the Temple named for him, the Gate of Nicanor. And the people would mention all of those whose contributions were listed favorably.


ื’ืžืณ ืžื“ืงืืžืจ ืœืฆืคื•ืŸ ื”ืžื–ื‘ื— ืžื›ืœืœ ื“ืžื–ื‘ื— ืœืื• ื‘ืฆืคื•ืŸ ืงืื™ ืžื ื™ ืจื‘ื™ ืืœื™ืขื–ืจ ื‘ืŸ ื™ืขืงื‘ ื”ื™ื ื“ืชื ื™ื ืฆืคื•ื ื” ืœืคื ื™ ื”ืณ ืฉื™ื”ื ืฆืคื•ืŸ ื›ื•ืœื• ืคื ื•ื™ ื“ื‘ืจื™ ืจื‘ื™ ืืœื™ืขื–ืจ ื‘ืŸ ื™ืขืงื‘


GEMARA: From the fact that it says in the mishna that the priest comes to the north of the altar, it can be learned by inference that the altar itself does not stand in the north but in the south of the courtyard. The Gemara asks: In accordance with whose opinion is the mishna? The Gemara answers: It is in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer ben Yaโ€™akov, as it was taught in a baraita that from the verse: โ€œAnd he shall slaughter it on the side of the altar northward before Godโ€ (Leviticus 1:11), it is derived that the entire north side should be vacant. The altar is in the south, and the north is vacant. This is the statement of Rabbi Eliezer ben Yaโ€™akov.


ื•ื”ื ืจื™ืฉื ืืœืขื–ืจ ื‘ืจื‘ื™ ืฉืžืขื•ืŸ ื”ื™ื ื›ื•ืœื” ืจื‘ื™ ืืœื™ืขื–ืจ ื‘ืŸ ื™ืขืงื‘ ื”ื™ื ื•ืชื ื™ ื‘ื‘ื™ืŸ ื”ืื•ืœื ื•ืœืžื–ื‘ื—


The Gemara asks: But isnโ€™t the first clause, the previous mishna, as explained above, in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Elazar, son of Rabbi Shimon, who holds that the altar was partially in the north? The Gemara rejects this assertion: The entire mishna, including the first clause, is in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer ben Yaโ€™akov. Emend the previous mishna and teach it as referring to the space adjacent to the area between the Entrance Hall and the altar and not actually the space between them, north of the altar, where everyone agrees that it is the north.


ื”ืกื’ืŸ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืืฉ ื‘ื™ืช ืื‘ ื‘ืฉืžืืœื• ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ื”ืžื”ืœืš ืœื™ืžื™ืŸ ืจื‘ื• ื”ืจื™ ื–ื” ื‘ื•ืจ ืชื ืŸ ื”ืกื’ืŸ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืืฉ ื‘ื™ืช ืื‘ ื‘ืฉืžืืœื•


ยง The mishna states that the deputy High Priest stands to the right of the High Priest, and the head of the patrilineal family is to his left. Rav Yehuda said with regard to the laws of etiquette: One who walks to the right of his teacher is a boor, in that he hasnโ€™t the slightest notion of good manners. The Gemara asks: Didnโ€™t we learn in the mishna that the deputy, who is like a student to the High Priest, is to the right of the High Priest, and the head of the patrilineal priestly family responsible for the Temple service that day is to his left?


ื•ืขื•ื“ ืชื ื™ื ืฉืœืฉื” ืฉื”ื™ื• ืžื”ืœื›ื™ืŸ ื‘ื“ืจืš ื”ืจื‘ ื‘ืืžืฆืข ื’ื“ื•ืœ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืงื˜ืŸ ืžืฉืžืืœื• ื•ื›ืŸ ืžืฆื™ื ื• ื‘ืฉืœืฉื” ืžืœืื›ื™ ื”ืฉืจืช ืฉื‘ืื• ืืฆืœ ืื‘ืจื”ื ืžื™ื›ืืœ ื‘ืืžืฆืข ื’ื‘ืจื™ืืœ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืคืืœ ื‘ืฉืžืืœื•


And furthermore, it was taught in a baraita: Three people who were walking on the road should not walk in single file but should walk with the teacher in the middle, the greater of the students on his right, and the lesser of them to his left. And so too do we find with the three ministering angels who came to Abraham: Michael, the greatest of the three, was in the middle, Gabriel was to his right, and Raphael was to his left. Apparently, a student walks to the right of his teacher.


ืชืจื’ื•ืžื ืจื‘ ืฉืžื•ืืœ ื‘ืจ ืคืคื ืงืžื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ ืื“ื ื›ื“ื™ ืฉื™ืชื›ืกื” ื‘ื• ืจื‘ื• ื•ื”ืชื ื™ื ื”ืžื”ืœืš ื›ื ื’ื“ ืจื‘ื• ื”ืจื™ ื–ื” ื‘ื•ืจ ืื—ื•ืจื™ ืจื‘ื• ื”ืจื™ ื–ื” ืžื’ืกื™ ื”ืจื•ื— ื“ืžืฆื“ื“ ืืฆื“ื•ื“ื™


Rav Shmuel bar Pappa interpreted it before Rav Adda: He does not walk next to his teacher as an equal, but walks slightly behind him so that he is slightly obscured by his teacher. The Gemara asks: But wasnโ€™t it taught in a baraita: One who walks next to his teacher is a boor; one who walks behind his teacher, allowing his teacher to walk before him, is among the arrogant. The Gemara answers: He does not walk directly beside him but slightly to his side and slightly behind his teacher.


ื•ืงืœืคื™ ื”ื™ืชื” ืฉื ื•ื‘ื” ืฉื ื™ ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืชื ื• ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื•ื ืชืŸ ืื”ืจืŸ ืขืœ ืฉื ื™ ื”ืฉืขื™ืจื ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช [ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช] ืฉืœ ื›ืœ ื“ื‘ืจ


ยง The mishna continues: And there was a lottery receptacle in the east of the courtyard there, and in it were two lots. The Sages taught the following in a baraita with regard to the verse: โ€œAnd Aaron shall place lots on the two goats, one lot for God and one lot for Azazelโ€ (Leviticus 16:8). Lots is a general term; they may be fashioned from any material, as the Torah does not specify the material of which they are made.


ื™ื›ื•ืœ ื™ืชืŸ ืฉื ื™ื ืขืœ ื–ื” ื•ืฉื ื™ื ืขืœ ื–ื” ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ ืœื”ืณ ื•ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ ืœืขื–ืื–ืœ ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœืฉื ืืœื ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ ื•ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœืขื–ืื–ืœ ืืœื ืื—ื“ ื™ื›ื•ืœ ื™ืชืŸ ืฉืœ ืฉื ื•ืฉืœ ืขื–ืื–ืœ ืขืœ ื–ื” ื•ืฉืœ ืฉื ื•ืฉืœ ืขื–ืื–ืœ ืขืœ ื–ื” ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ [ืœื”ืณ ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœื”ืณ ืืœื ืื—ื“ ื•ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœืขื–ืื–ืœ ืืœื ืื—ื“] ืื ื›ืŸ ืžื” ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืฉื™ื”ื™ื• ืฉื•ื™ืŸ ืฉืœื ื™ืขืฉื” ืื—ื“ ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื•ืื—ื“ ืฉืœ ื›ืกืฃ ืื—ื“ ื’ื“ื•ืœ ื•ืื—ื“ ืงื˜ืŸ


One might have thought that he should place two lots on this goat and two lots on that goat; therefore, the verse states: โ€œOne lot for God and one lot for Azazelโ€ (Leviticus 16:8), meaning there is only one lot here for God, and there is only one lot here for Azazel. Likewise, one might have thought he should place the lot of God and the lot of Azazel on this goat, and the lot of God and the lot of Azazel on that goat; therefore, the verse states: One lot for God, i.e., there is only one lot here for God, and there is only one lot here for Azazel. If so, what is the meaning when the verse states lots, in the plural, since each of the two goats has one lot not two? It is to teach that the two lots should be identical; that he should not make one of gold and one of silver, or one big and one small.


ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืฉืœ ื›ืœ ื“ื‘ืจ ืคืฉื™ื˜ื ืœื ืฆืจื™ื›ื ืœื›ื“ืชื ื™ื ืœืคื™ ืฉืžืฆื™ื ื• ื‘ืฆื™ืฅ ืฉื”ืฉื ื›ืชื•ื‘ ืขืœื™ื• ื•ื”ื•ื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื™ื›ื•ืœ ืืฃ ื–ื” ื›ืŸ ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœ ื’ื•ืจืœ ืจื™ื‘ื” ืจื™ื‘ื” ืฉืœ ื–ื™ืช ืจื™ื‘ื” ืฉืœ ืื’ื•ื– ืจื™ื‘ื” ืฉืœ ืืฉื›ืจื•ืข


It was taught in the baraita that the lots may be fashioned from any material. The Gemara asks: This is obvious, considering that the Torah does not designate a particular material. The Gemara answers: No, it is necessary only due to that which was taught in a baraita: Because we find with regard to the High Priestโ€™s frontplate that the name of God was written upon it and it was made of gold, one might have thought that this lot, too, should be made of gold since it has Godโ€™s name on it. Therefore, the verse states: Lot, lot, twice to include other materials and not exclusively gold. It includes lots made of olive wood, and includes lots made of walnut wood, and includes lots made of boxwood.


ื‘ืŸ ืงื˜ื™ืŸ ืขืฉื” ืฉื ื™ื ืขืฉืจ ื“ื“ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ื•ื›ื•ืณ ืชื ื ื›ื“ื™ ืฉื™ื”ื™ื• ืฉื ื™ื ืขืฉืจ ืื—ื™ื• ื”ื›ื”ื ื™ื ื”ืขืกื•ืงื™ืŸ ื‘ืชืžื™ื“ ืžืงื“ืฉื™ืŸ ื™ื“ื™ื”ืŸ ื•ืจื’ืœื™ื”ืŸ ื‘ื‘ืช ืื—ืช ืชื ื ืฉื—ืจื™ืช ื‘ืžื™ืœื•ืื• ืžืงื“ืฉ ื™ื“ื™ื• ื•ืจื’ืœื™ื• ืžืŸ ื”ืขืœื™ื•ืŸ ืขืจื‘ื™ืช ื‘ื™ืจื™ื“ืชื• ืžืงื“ืฉ ื™ื“ื™ื• ื•ืจื’ืœื™ื• ืžืŸ ื”ืชื—ืชื•ืŸ


ยง The mishna continues: The High Priest ben Katin made twelve spigots for the basin. It was taught: Ben Katin did this so that twelve of his fellow priests, who are occupied with sacrificing the daily offering as explained above, could sanctify their hands and their feet simultaneously. It was taught: In the morning, when the basin is full, one sanctifies his hands and his feet from the spigots fixed at the top of the basin because the water level is high. And in the afternoon, when the water level is low, he sanctifies his hands and his feet from the spigots fixed at the bottom.


ื•ืืฃ ื”ื•ื ืขืฉื” ืžื•ื›ื ื™ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ื•ื›ื•ืณ ืžืื™ ืžื•ื›ื ื™ ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ื’ื™ืœื’ืœื ื“ื”ื•ื” ืžืฉืงืขื ืœื™ื”


The mishna continues with regard to ben Katin: He also made a machine for sinking the basin. The Gemara asks: What is this machine? Abaye said: It is a wheel with which he lowered the basin into the pit.


ืžื•ื ื‘ื– ื”ืžืœืš ืขืฉื” ื›ืœ ื™ื“ื•ืช ื”ื›ืœื™ื ื•ื›ื•ืณ ื ืขื‘ื“ื™ื ื”ื• ืœื“ื™ื“ื”ื• ื“ื–ื”ื‘


The mishna continues: King Munbaz would contribute the funds required to make the handles of all the Yom Kippur vessels of gold. The Gemara asks: If he wanted to donate money to beautify the Temple, he should have made the vessels themselves of gold, not just the handles.


ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ื‘ื™ื“ื•ืช ืกื›ื™ื ื™ืŸ ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ืืฃ ื”ื•ื ืขืฉื” ื›ื ื™ ื›ืœื™ื ื•ืื•ื’ื ื™ ื›ืœื™ื ื•ื™ื“ื•ืช ื›ืœื™ื ื•ื™ื“ื•ืช ืกื›ื™ื ื™ืŸ ืฉืœ ื™ื•ื ื”ื›ืคื•ืจื™ื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ืชืจื’ื•ืžื ืื‘ื™ื™ ื‘ืงืชืชื ื“ื ืจื’ื™ ื•ื—ืฆื™ื ื™


Abaye said: Although gold is not suitable for knife blades, as it is too soft for use in slaughter, the mishna is referring to knife handles. The Gemara raises an objection from a different baraita: King Munbaz also made the bases of vessels, the grips of vessels, the handles of vessels, and the handles of knives of Yom Kippur of gold. Apparently, knives are not categorized as vessels; therefore, the handles of the Yom Kippur vessels that Munbaz donated were not knife handles. The Gemara answers: Abaye interpreted that Munbaz donated gold for the handles of axes and hatchets. The blades of these implements cannot be made of gold; rather, like knives, they require stronger material.


ื”ื™ืœื ื™ ืืžื• ืขืฉืชื” ื ื‘ืจืฉืช ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื•ื›ื•ืณ ืชื ื ื‘ืฉืขื” ืฉื”ื—ืžื” ื–ื•ืจื—ืช ื ื™ืฆื•ืฆื•ืช ื™ื•ืฆืื™ืŸ ืžืžื ื” ื•ื”ื›ืœ ื™ื•ื“ืขื™ืŸ ืฉื”ื’ื™ืข ื–ืžืŸ ืงืจื™ืืช ืฉืžืข


ยง The mishna continues: Queen Helene, his mother, fashioned a decorative gold chandelier above the entrance of the Sanctuary. It was taught in a mishna: When the sun rose, sparks of light would emanate from the chandelier, which was polished, and everyone knew that the time to recite Shema had arrived. The ideal time to recite Shema is at the moment of sunrise.


ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ื”ืงื•ืจื ืืช ืฉืžืข ืฉื—ืจื™ืช ืขื ืื ืฉื™ ืžืฉืžืจ ื•ืื ืฉื™ ืžืขืžื“ ืœื ื™ืฆื ืžืคื ื™ ืฉืื ืฉื™ ืžืฉืžืจ ืžืฉื›ื™ืžื™ืŸ ื•ืื ืฉื™ ืžืขืžื“ ืžืื—ืจื™ื ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ืœืฉืืจ ืขืžื ื“ื‘ื™ืจื•ืฉืœื™ื


The Gemara raises an objection: One who recites Shema in the morning with the men of the priestly watch, who served in the Temple during a given week, or with the men of the non-priestly watch, designated groups of Israelites who accompanied the priestly watch to Jerusalem that week, did not fulfill his obligation. That is because the men of the priestly watch recite Shema too early so that they will have sufficient time to perform the Temple service, and the men of the non-priestly watch, who recite lengthy prayers and stand over the daily morning offering when it is sacrificed, postpone reciting Shema. For whom, then, did the emanating sparks signal the time to recite Shema? Abaye said: It was an indicator for the rest of the people in Jerusalem, who recited Shema at the appropriate time to recite Shema.


ื•ืืฃ ื”ื™ื ืขืฉืชื” ื˜ื‘ืœื ืฉืžืขืช ืžื™ื ื” ื›ื•ืชื‘ื™ืŸ ืžื’ื™ืœื” ืœืชื™ื ื•ืง ืœื”ืชืœืžื“ ื‘ื” ืืžืจ ืจื™ืฉ ืœืงื™ืฉ ืžืฉื•ื ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื ืื™ ื‘ืืœืฃ ื‘ื™ืช


ยง The mishna relates: Queen Helene also fashioned a golden tablet on which the sota Torah portion was written. The Gemara comments: You learn from this that one may write a scroll that contains only several portions of the Torah, from which a child may be taught. The Sages disputed whether it is permitted to do so even for the purpose of education. Reish Lakish said in the name of Rabbi Yannai: There is no proof from this mishna, as the tablet prepared by Queen Helene consisted of the letters of the alefbeit, i.e., only the first letter of each word was written on the tablet, representing the word.


ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ื›ืฉื”ื•ื ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืจื•ืื” ื•ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืžื” ืฉื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื ืื™ืžื ืจื•ืื” ื•ื›ื•ืชื‘ ื›ืžื” ืฉื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื


The Gemara raises an objection from the halakhot of sota: When the scribe writes the sota scroll, he looks and writes that which is written on the tablet. Apparently, the full text of the passage was written on the tablet. The Gemara rejects this: Emend the baraita and say: He looks and writes like that which is written on the tablet. The tablet aids the scribe in remembering the text that must be written.


ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ื›ืฉื”ื•ื ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืจื•ืื” ื•ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืžื” ืฉื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื ื•ืžื” ื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื ืื ืฉื›ื‘ ืื™ืฉ ืื•ืชืš [ื•ืื ืœื ืฉื›ื‘] ืื ืฉื˜ื™ืช ืื ืœื ืฉื˜ื™ืช ื”ืชื


The Gemara raises an objection from a different baraita: When he writes, he looks and writes that which is written on the tablet. And what is written on the tablet? If a man lay with youโ€ฆand if he did not lay with you; if you strayedโ€ฆif you did not stray (see Numbers 5:19โ€“20). Apparently, the full text of the passage was written on the tablet. The Gemara answers: There, it was written


Masechet Yoma is sponsored by Vicky Harari in commemoration of her father's Yahrzeit, Avraham Baruch Hacohen ben Zeev Eliyahu Eckstein z'l, a Holocaust survivor and a feminist before it was fashionable. And in gratitude to Michelle Cohen Farber for revolutionizing women's learning worldwide.

This month's shiurim are sponsored by Josh Sussman in honor of both his wife, Romiโ€™s 50th birthday and son, Zeli. "He will, Bโ€™Ezrat HaShem, be making his first solo siyum on Masechet Yoma at his Bar Mitzvah in July".

And for a refuah shleima for Pesha Etel bat Sarah.

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Yoma 37

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Yoma 37

ื•ืžื ื™ืŸ ืฉื‘ืื ื ื ืืžืจ ื›ืืŸ ื›ืคืจื” ื•ื ืืžืจ ืœื”ืœืŸ ื‘ื—ื•ืจื‘ ื›ืคืจื” ืžื” ืœื”ืœืŸ ื‘ืื ื ืืฃ ื›ืืŸ ื‘ืื ื ื•ืžื ื™ืŸ ืฉื‘ืฉื ื ืืžืจ ื›ืืŸ ื›ืคืจื” ื•ื ืืžืจื” ื‘ืขื’ืœื” ืขืจื•ืคื” ื›ืคืจื” ืžื” ืœื”ืœืŸ ื‘ืฉื ืืฃ ื›ืืŸ ื‘ืฉื


And from where is it derived that the confession must begin with the word please? It is stated here: Atonement, and it is stated there, just before Mosesโ€™s plea following the sin of the Golden Calf at Horeb: โ€œPerhaps I may secure atonement for your sinโ€ (Exodus 32:30). Just as there, the prayer includes: โ€œPlease, this people is guilty of a great sinโ€ (Exodus 32:31), so too here, the term please should be used. And from where is it derived that the Yom Kippur confession includes the name of God? It is stated here: Atonement, and it is stated with regard to the heifer whose neck is broken: โ€œAtone, O God, for Your nation of Israel whom You redeemed, and do not let guilt for the blood of the innocent remain among Your people Israel, and they will be atoned of bloodguiltโ€ (Deuteronomy 21:8). Just as there, with regard to the heifer, the name of God is mentioned, so too here, the name of God is mentioned.


ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ื‘ืฉืœืžื ื—ื•ืจื‘ ืžืขื’ืœื” ืขืจื•ืคื” ืœื ื™ืœื™ืฃ ืžืื™ ื“ื”ื•ื” ื”ื•ื” ืืœื ืขื’ืœื” ืขืจื•ืคื” ืชื™ืœื™ืฃ ืžื—ื•ืจื‘ ื•ื›ื™ ืชื™ืžื ื”ื›ื™ ื ืžื™ ื•ื”ืชื ืŸ ื”ื›ื”ื ื™ื ืื•ืžืจื™ื ื›ืคืจ ืœืขืžืš ื™ืฉืจืืœ ื•ืื™ืœื• ื‘ืื ื ืœื ืงื ืืžืจ ืงืฉื™ื


Abaye said: Granted, the obligation to include the name of God in the confession at Horeb cannot be derived from the heifer whose neck is broken, since what was, was. The sin of the Golden Calf predated the mitzva of the heifer. However, you should derive that the confession in the ritual of the heifer whose neck is broken requires use of the term: Please, from Horeb, where Moses employed that term. And if you say that is so, and the term: Please, should be employed, didnโ€™t we learn in a mishna that the priests say: โ€œAtone, O God, for Your nation, Israelโ€ (Deuteronomy 21:8), while the mishna does not state the term please. Apparently, the formula of confession during the ritual of the heifer is not derived from Horeb. The Gemara says: It is indeed difficult why that is not derived.


ื•ื”ืŸ ืขื•ื ื™ืŸ ืื—ืจื™ื• ืชื ื™ื ืจื‘ื™ ืื•ืžืจ ื›ื™ ืฉื ื”ืณ ืืงืจื ื”ื‘ื• ื’ื•ื“ืœ ืœืืœื”ื™ื ื• ืืžืจ ืœื”ื ืžืฉื” ืœื™ืฉืจืืœ ื‘ืฉืขื” ืฉืื ื™ ืžื–ื›ื™ืจ ืฉืžื• ืฉืœ ื”ืงื“ื•ืฉ ื‘ืจื•ืš ื”ื•ื ืืชื ื”ื‘ื• ื’ื•ื“ืœ ื—ื ื ื™ื” ื‘ืŸ ืื—ื™ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ืฉืข ืื•ืžืจ ื–ื›ืจ ืฆื“ื™ืง ืœื‘ืจื›ื” ืืžืจ ืœื”ื ื ื‘ื™ื ืœื™ืฉืจืืœ ื‘ืฉืขื” ืฉืื ื™ ืžื–ื›ื™ืจ ืฆื“ื™ืง ืขื•ืœืžื™ื ืืชื ืชื ื• ื‘ืจื›ื”


ยง The mishna continues: And the priests and the people who were in the courtyard respond after he recites the name of God: Blessed be the name of His glorious kingdom forever and all time. It was taught in a baraita that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi says the following with regard to the verse: โ€œWhen I call out the name of the Lord, give glory to our Godโ€ (Deuteronomy 32:3). Moses said to the Jewish people: When I mention the name of the Holy One, Blessed be He, you give Him glory and recite praises in his honor. แธคananya, son of the brother of Rabbi Yehoshua, says that proof for the practice is from a different source: โ€œThe memory of the righteous shall be for a blessingโ€ (Proverbs 10:7). The prophet, Solomon, said to the Jewish people: When I mention the Righteous One of all worlds, you accord Him a blessing.


ืžืชื ื™ืณ ื‘ื ืœื• ืœืžื–ืจื— ื”ืขื–ืจื” ืœืฆืคื•ืŸ ื”ืžื–ื‘ื— ื”ืกื’ืŸ ืžื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืืฉ ื‘ื™ืช ืื‘ ืžืฉืžืืœื• ื•ืฉื ืฉื ื™ ืฉืขื™ืจื™ื ื•ืงืœืคื™ ื”ื™ืชื” ืฉื ื•ื‘ื” ืฉื ื™ ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืฉืœ ืืฉื›ืจื•ืข ื”ื™ื• ื•ืขืฉืืŸ ื‘ืŸ ื’ืžืœื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื•ื”ื™ื• ืžื–ื›ื™ืจื™ื ืื•ืชื• ืœืฉื‘ื—


MISHNA: The priest then came to the eastern side of the Temple courtyard, farthest from the Holy of Holies, to the north of the altar. The deputy was to his right, and the head of the patrilineal family belonging to the priestly watch that was assigned to serve in the Temple that week was to his left. And they arranged two goats there, and there was a lottery receptacle there, and in it were two lots. These were originally made of boxwood, and the High Priest Yehoshua ben Gamla fashioned them of gold, and the people would mention him favorably for what he did.


ื‘ืŸ ืงื˜ื™ืŸ ืขืฉื” ืฉื ื™ื ืขืฉืจ ื“ื“ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ืฉืœื ื”ื™ื” ืœื• ืืœื ืฉื ื™ื ื•ืืฃ ื”ื•ื ืขืฉื” ืžื•ื›ื ื™ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ืฉืœื ื™ื”ื™ื• ืžื™ืžื™ื• ื ืคืกืœื™ืŸ ื‘ืœื™ื ื”


Since the mishna mentions an item designed to enhance the Temple service, it also lists other such items: The High Priest ben Katin made twelve spigots for the basin so that several priests could sanctify their hands and feet at once, as previously the basin had only two. He also made a machine [mukheni] for sinking the basin into flowing water during the night so that its water would not be disqualified by remaining overnight. Had the water remained in the basin overnight, it would have been necessary to pour it out the following morning. By immersing the basin in flowing water, the water inside remained fit for use the next morning.


ืžื•ื ื‘ื– ื”ืžืœืš ื”ื™ื” ืขื•ืฉื” ื›ืœ ื™ื“ื•ืช ื”ื›ืœื™ื ืฉืœ ื™ื•ื ื”ื›ืคื•ืจื™ื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื”ื™ืœื ื™ ืืžื• ืขืฉืชื” ื ื‘ืจืฉืช ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ืขืœ ืคืชื— ื”ื™ื›ืœ ื•ืืฃ ื”ื™ื ืขืฉืชื” ื˜ื‘ืœื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ืฉืคืจืฉืช ืกื•ื˜ื” ื›ืชื•ื‘ื” ืขืœื™ื” ื ืงื ื•ืจ ื ืขืฉื• ื ืกื™ื ืœื“ืœืชื•ืชื™ื• ื•ื”ื™ื• ืžื–ื›ื™ืจื™ืŸ ืื•ืชืŸ ืœืฉื‘ื—


King Munbaz would contribute the funds required to make the handles of all the Yom Kippur vessels of gold. Queen Helene, his mother, fashioned a decorative gold chandelier above the entrance of the Sanctuary. She also fashioned a golden tablet [tavla] on which the Torah portion relating to sota was written. The tablet could be utilized to copy this Torah portion, so that a Torah scroll need not be taken out for that purpose. With regard to Nicanor, miracles were performed to his doors, the doors in the gate of the Temple named for him, the Gate of Nicanor. And the people would mention all of those whose contributions were listed favorably.


ื’ืžืณ ืžื“ืงืืžืจ ืœืฆืคื•ืŸ ื”ืžื–ื‘ื— ืžื›ืœืœ ื“ืžื–ื‘ื— ืœืื• ื‘ืฆืคื•ืŸ ืงืื™ ืžื ื™ ืจื‘ื™ ืืœื™ืขื–ืจ ื‘ืŸ ื™ืขืงื‘ ื”ื™ื ื“ืชื ื™ื ืฆืคื•ื ื” ืœืคื ื™ ื”ืณ ืฉื™ื”ื ืฆืคื•ืŸ ื›ื•ืœื• ืคื ื•ื™ ื“ื‘ืจื™ ืจื‘ื™ ืืœื™ืขื–ืจ ื‘ืŸ ื™ืขืงื‘


GEMARA: From the fact that it says in the mishna that the priest comes to the north of the altar, it can be learned by inference that the altar itself does not stand in the north but in the south of the courtyard. The Gemara asks: In accordance with whose opinion is the mishna? The Gemara answers: It is in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer ben Yaโ€™akov, as it was taught in a baraita that from the verse: โ€œAnd he shall slaughter it on the side of the altar northward before Godโ€ (Leviticus 1:11), it is derived that the entire north side should be vacant. The altar is in the south, and the north is vacant. This is the statement of Rabbi Eliezer ben Yaโ€™akov.


ื•ื”ื ืจื™ืฉื ืืœืขื–ืจ ื‘ืจื‘ื™ ืฉืžืขื•ืŸ ื”ื™ื ื›ื•ืœื” ืจื‘ื™ ืืœื™ืขื–ืจ ื‘ืŸ ื™ืขืงื‘ ื”ื™ื ื•ืชื ื™ ื‘ื‘ื™ืŸ ื”ืื•ืœื ื•ืœืžื–ื‘ื—


The Gemara asks: But isnโ€™t the first clause, the previous mishna, as explained above, in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Elazar, son of Rabbi Shimon, who holds that the altar was partially in the north? The Gemara rejects this assertion: The entire mishna, including the first clause, is in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Eliezer ben Yaโ€™akov. Emend the previous mishna and teach it as referring to the space adjacent to the area between the Entrance Hall and the altar and not actually the space between them, north of the altar, where everyone agrees that it is the north.


ื”ืกื’ืŸ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืืฉ ื‘ื™ืช ืื‘ ื‘ืฉืžืืœื• ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ื”ืžื”ืœืš ืœื™ืžื™ืŸ ืจื‘ื• ื”ืจื™ ื–ื” ื‘ื•ืจ ืชื ืŸ ื”ืกื’ืŸ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืืฉ ื‘ื™ืช ืื‘ ื‘ืฉืžืืœื•


ยง The mishna states that the deputy High Priest stands to the right of the High Priest, and the head of the patrilineal family is to his left. Rav Yehuda said with regard to the laws of etiquette: One who walks to the right of his teacher is a boor, in that he hasnโ€™t the slightest notion of good manners. The Gemara asks: Didnโ€™t we learn in the mishna that the deputy, who is like a student to the High Priest, is to the right of the High Priest, and the head of the patrilineal priestly family responsible for the Temple service that day is to his left?


ื•ืขื•ื“ ืชื ื™ื ืฉืœืฉื” ืฉื”ื™ื• ืžื”ืœื›ื™ืŸ ื‘ื“ืจืš ื”ืจื‘ ื‘ืืžืฆืข ื’ื“ื•ืœ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืงื˜ืŸ ืžืฉืžืืœื• ื•ื›ืŸ ืžืฆื™ื ื• ื‘ืฉืœืฉื” ืžืœืื›ื™ ื”ืฉืจืช ืฉื‘ืื• ืืฆืœ ืื‘ืจื”ื ืžื™ื›ืืœ ื‘ืืžืฆืข ื’ื‘ืจื™ืืœ ื‘ื™ืžื™ื ื• ื•ืจืคืืœ ื‘ืฉืžืืœื•


And furthermore, it was taught in a baraita: Three people who were walking on the road should not walk in single file but should walk with the teacher in the middle, the greater of the students on his right, and the lesser of them to his left. And so too do we find with the three ministering angels who came to Abraham: Michael, the greatest of the three, was in the middle, Gabriel was to his right, and Raphael was to his left. Apparently, a student walks to the right of his teacher.


ืชืจื’ื•ืžื ืจื‘ ืฉืžื•ืืœ ื‘ืจ ืคืคื ืงืžื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ ืื“ื ื›ื“ื™ ืฉื™ืชื›ืกื” ื‘ื• ืจื‘ื• ื•ื”ืชื ื™ื ื”ืžื”ืœืš ื›ื ื’ื“ ืจื‘ื• ื”ืจื™ ื–ื” ื‘ื•ืจ ืื—ื•ืจื™ ืจื‘ื• ื”ืจื™ ื–ื” ืžื’ืกื™ ื”ืจื•ื— ื“ืžืฆื“ื“ ืืฆื“ื•ื“ื™


Rav Shmuel bar Pappa interpreted it before Rav Adda: He does not walk next to his teacher as an equal, but walks slightly behind him so that he is slightly obscured by his teacher. The Gemara asks: But wasnโ€™t it taught in a baraita: One who walks next to his teacher is a boor; one who walks behind his teacher, allowing his teacher to walk before him, is among the arrogant. The Gemara answers: He does not walk directly beside him but slightly to his side and slightly behind his teacher.


ื•ืงืœืคื™ ื”ื™ืชื” ืฉื ื•ื‘ื” ืฉื ื™ ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืชื ื• ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื•ื ืชืŸ ืื”ืจืŸ ืขืœ ืฉื ื™ ื”ืฉืขื™ืจื ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช [ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช] ืฉืœ ื›ืœ ื“ื‘ืจ


ยง The mishna continues: And there was a lottery receptacle in the east of the courtyard there, and in it were two lots. The Sages taught the following in a baraita with regard to the verse: โ€œAnd Aaron shall place lots on the two goats, one lot for God and one lot for Azazelโ€ (Leviticus 16:8). Lots is a general term; they may be fashioned from any material, as the Torah does not specify the material of which they are made.


ื™ื›ื•ืœ ื™ืชืŸ ืฉื ื™ื ืขืœ ื–ื” ื•ืฉื ื™ื ืขืœ ื–ื” ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ ืœื”ืณ ื•ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ ืœืขื–ืื–ืœ ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœืฉื ืืœื ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ ื•ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœืขื–ืื–ืœ ืืœื ืื—ื“ ื™ื›ื•ืœ ื™ืชืŸ ืฉืœ ืฉื ื•ืฉืœ ืขื–ืื–ืœ ืขืœ ื–ื” ื•ืฉืœ ืฉื ื•ืฉืœ ืขื–ืื–ืœ ืขืœ ื–ื” ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœ ืื—ื“ [ืœื”ืณ ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœื”ืณ ืืœื ืื—ื“ ื•ืื™ืŸ ื›ืืŸ ืœืขื–ืื–ืœ ืืœื ืื—ื“] ืื ื›ืŸ ืžื” ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืฉื™ื”ื™ื• ืฉื•ื™ืŸ ืฉืœื ื™ืขืฉื” ืื—ื“ ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื•ืื—ื“ ืฉืœ ื›ืกืฃ ืื—ื“ ื’ื“ื•ืœ ื•ืื—ื“ ืงื˜ืŸ


One might have thought that he should place two lots on this goat and two lots on that goat; therefore, the verse states: โ€œOne lot for God and one lot for Azazelโ€ (Leviticus 16:8), meaning there is only one lot here for God, and there is only one lot here for Azazel. Likewise, one might have thought he should place the lot of God and the lot of Azazel on this goat, and the lot of God and the lot of Azazel on that goat; therefore, the verse states: One lot for God, i.e., there is only one lot here for God, and there is only one lot here for Azazel. If so, what is the meaning when the verse states lots, in the plural, since each of the two goats has one lot not two? It is to teach that the two lots should be identical; that he should not make one of gold and one of silver, or one big and one small.


ื’ื•ืจืœื•ืช ืฉืœ ื›ืœ ื“ื‘ืจ ืคืฉื™ื˜ื ืœื ืฆืจื™ื›ื ืœื›ื“ืชื ื™ื ืœืคื™ ืฉืžืฆื™ื ื• ื‘ืฆื™ืฅ ืฉื”ืฉื ื›ืชื•ื‘ ืขืœื™ื• ื•ื”ื•ื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื™ื›ื•ืœ ืืฃ ื–ื” ื›ืŸ ืชืœืžื•ื“ ืœื•ืžืจ ื’ื•ืจืœ ื’ื•ืจืœ ืจื™ื‘ื” ืจื™ื‘ื” ืฉืœ ื–ื™ืช ืจื™ื‘ื” ืฉืœ ืื’ื•ื– ืจื™ื‘ื” ืฉืœ ืืฉื›ืจื•ืข


It was taught in the baraita that the lots may be fashioned from any material. The Gemara asks: This is obvious, considering that the Torah does not designate a particular material. The Gemara answers: No, it is necessary only due to that which was taught in a baraita: Because we find with regard to the High Priestโ€™s frontplate that the name of God was written upon it and it was made of gold, one might have thought that this lot, too, should be made of gold since it has Godโ€™s name on it. Therefore, the verse states: Lot, lot, twice to include other materials and not exclusively gold. It includes lots made of olive wood, and includes lots made of walnut wood, and includes lots made of boxwood.


ื‘ืŸ ืงื˜ื™ืŸ ืขืฉื” ืฉื ื™ื ืขืฉืจ ื“ื“ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ื•ื›ื•ืณ ืชื ื ื›ื“ื™ ืฉื™ื”ื™ื• ืฉื ื™ื ืขืฉืจ ืื—ื™ื• ื”ื›ื”ื ื™ื ื”ืขืกื•ืงื™ืŸ ื‘ืชืžื™ื“ ืžืงื“ืฉื™ืŸ ื™ื“ื™ื”ืŸ ื•ืจื’ืœื™ื”ืŸ ื‘ื‘ืช ืื—ืช ืชื ื ืฉื—ืจื™ืช ื‘ืžื™ืœื•ืื• ืžืงื“ืฉ ื™ื“ื™ื• ื•ืจื’ืœื™ื• ืžืŸ ื”ืขืœื™ื•ืŸ ืขืจื‘ื™ืช ื‘ื™ืจื™ื“ืชื• ืžืงื“ืฉ ื™ื“ื™ื• ื•ืจื’ืœื™ื• ืžืŸ ื”ืชื—ืชื•ืŸ


ยง The mishna continues: The High Priest ben Katin made twelve spigots for the basin. It was taught: Ben Katin did this so that twelve of his fellow priests, who are occupied with sacrificing the daily offering as explained above, could sanctify their hands and their feet simultaneously. It was taught: In the morning, when the basin is full, one sanctifies his hands and his feet from the spigots fixed at the top of the basin because the water level is high. And in the afternoon, when the water level is low, he sanctifies his hands and his feet from the spigots fixed at the bottom.


ื•ืืฃ ื”ื•ื ืขืฉื” ืžื•ื›ื ื™ ืœื›ื™ื•ืจ ื•ื›ื•ืณ ืžืื™ ืžื•ื›ื ื™ ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ื’ื™ืœื’ืœื ื“ื”ื•ื” ืžืฉืงืขื ืœื™ื”


The mishna continues with regard to ben Katin: He also made a machine for sinking the basin. The Gemara asks: What is this machine? Abaye said: It is a wheel with which he lowered the basin into the pit.


ืžื•ื ื‘ื– ื”ืžืœืš ืขืฉื” ื›ืœ ื™ื“ื•ืช ื”ื›ืœื™ื ื•ื›ื•ืณ ื ืขื‘ื“ื™ื ื”ื• ืœื“ื™ื“ื”ื• ื“ื–ื”ื‘


The mishna continues: King Munbaz would contribute the funds required to make the handles of all the Yom Kippur vessels of gold. The Gemara asks: If he wanted to donate money to beautify the Temple, he should have made the vessels themselves of gold, not just the handles.


ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ื‘ื™ื“ื•ืช ืกื›ื™ื ื™ืŸ ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ืืฃ ื”ื•ื ืขืฉื” ื›ื ื™ ื›ืœื™ื ื•ืื•ื’ื ื™ ื›ืœื™ื ื•ื™ื“ื•ืช ื›ืœื™ื ื•ื™ื“ื•ืช ืกื›ื™ื ื™ืŸ ืฉืœ ื™ื•ื ื”ื›ืคื•ืจื™ื ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ืชืจื’ื•ืžื ืื‘ื™ื™ ื‘ืงืชืชื ื“ื ืจื’ื™ ื•ื—ืฆื™ื ื™


Abaye said: Although gold is not suitable for knife blades, as it is too soft for use in slaughter, the mishna is referring to knife handles. The Gemara raises an objection from a different baraita: King Munbaz also made the bases of vessels, the grips of vessels, the handles of vessels, and the handles of knives of Yom Kippur of gold. Apparently, knives are not categorized as vessels; therefore, the handles of the Yom Kippur vessels that Munbaz donated were not knife handles. The Gemara answers: Abaye interpreted that Munbaz donated gold for the handles of axes and hatchets. The blades of these implements cannot be made of gold; rather, like knives, they require stronger material.


ื”ื™ืœื ื™ ืืžื• ืขืฉืชื” ื ื‘ืจืฉืช ืฉืœ ื–ื”ื‘ ื•ื›ื•ืณ ืชื ื ื‘ืฉืขื” ืฉื”ื—ืžื” ื–ื•ืจื—ืช ื ื™ืฆื•ืฆื•ืช ื™ื•ืฆืื™ืŸ ืžืžื ื” ื•ื”ื›ืœ ื™ื•ื“ืขื™ืŸ ืฉื”ื’ื™ืข ื–ืžืŸ ืงืจื™ืืช ืฉืžืข


ยง The mishna continues: Queen Helene, his mother, fashioned a decorative gold chandelier above the entrance of the Sanctuary. It was taught in a mishna: When the sun rose, sparks of light would emanate from the chandelier, which was polished, and everyone knew that the time to recite Shema had arrived. The ideal time to recite Shema is at the moment of sunrise.


ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ื”ืงื•ืจื ืืช ืฉืžืข ืฉื—ืจื™ืช ืขื ืื ืฉื™ ืžืฉืžืจ ื•ืื ืฉื™ ืžืขืžื“ ืœื ื™ืฆื ืžืคื ื™ ืฉืื ืฉื™ ืžืฉืžืจ ืžืฉื›ื™ืžื™ืŸ ื•ืื ืฉื™ ืžืขืžื“ ืžืื—ืจื™ื ืืžืจ ืื‘ื™ื™ ืœืฉืืจ ืขืžื ื“ื‘ื™ืจื•ืฉืœื™ื


The Gemara raises an objection: One who recites Shema in the morning with the men of the priestly watch, who served in the Temple during a given week, or with the men of the non-priestly watch, designated groups of Israelites who accompanied the priestly watch to Jerusalem that week, did not fulfill his obligation. That is because the men of the priestly watch recite Shema too early so that they will have sufficient time to perform the Temple service, and the men of the non-priestly watch, who recite lengthy prayers and stand over the daily morning offering when it is sacrificed, postpone reciting Shema. For whom, then, did the emanating sparks signal the time to recite Shema? Abaye said: It was an indicator for the rest of the people in Jerusalem, who recited Shema at the appropriate time to recite Shema.


ื•ืืฃ ื”ื™ื ืขืฉืชื” ื˜ื‘ืœื ืฉืžืขืช ืžื™ื ื” ื›ื•ืชื‘ื™ืŸ ืžื’ื™ืœื” ืœืชื™ื ื•ืง ืœื”ืชืœืžื“ ื‘ื” ืืžืจ ืจื™ืฉ ืœืงื™ืฉ ืžืฉื•ื ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื ืื™ ื‘ืืœืฃ ื‘ื™ืช


ยง The mishna relates: Queen Helene also fashioned a golden tablet on which the sota Torah portion was written. The Gemara comments: You learn from this that one may write a scroll that contains only several portions of the Torah, from which a child may be taught. The Sages disputed whether it is permitted to do so even for the purpose of education. Reish Lakish said in the name of Rabbi Yannai: There is no proof from this mishna, as the tablet prepared by Queen Helene consisted of the letters of the alefbeit, i.e., only the first letter of each word was written on the tablet, representing the word.


ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ื›ืฉื”ื•ื ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืจื•ืื” ื•ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืžื” ืฉื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื ืื™ืžื ืจื•ืื” ื•ื›ื•ืชื‘ ื›ืžื” ืฉื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื


The Gemara raises an objection from the halakhot of sota: When the scribe writes the sota scroll, he looks and writes that which is written on the tablet. Apparently, the full text of the passage was written on the tablet. The Gemara rejects this: Emend the baraita and say: He looks and writes like that which is written on the tablet. The tablet aids the scribe in remembering the text that must be written.


ืžื™ืชื™ื‘ื™ ื›ืฉื”ื•ื ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืจื•ืื” ื•ื›ื•ืชื‘ ืžื” ืฉื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื ื•ืžื” ื›ืชื•ื‘ ื‘ื˜ื‘ืœื ืื ืฉื›ื‘ ืื™ืฉ ืื•ืชืš [ื•ืื ืœื ืฉื›ื‘] ืื ืฉื˜ื™ืช ืื ืœื ืฉื˜ื™ืช ื”ืชื


The Gemara raises an objection from a different baraita: When he writes, he looks and writes that which is written on the tablet. And what is written on the tablet? If a man lay with youโ€ฆand if he did not lay with you; if you strayedโ€ฆif you did not stray (see Numbers 5:19โ€“20). Apparently, the full text of the passage was written on the tablet. The Gemara answers: There, it was written


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