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Today's Daf Yomi

February 21, 2019 | ื˜ืดื– ื‘ืื“ืจ ืืณ ืชืฉืขืดื˜

  • This month's learning is sponsored by Ron and Shira Krebs to commemorate the 73rd yahrzeit of Shira's grandfather (Yitzchak Leib Ben David Ber HaCohen v'Malka), the 1st yahrzeit of Shira's father (Gershon Pinya Ben Yitzchak Leib HaCohen v'Menucha Sara), and the bar mitzvah of their son Eytan who will be making a siyum on Mishna Shas this month.

  • This month's learning is sponsored for the refuah shleima of Naama bat Yael Esther.

Chullin 86

What is the law regarding theย slaughter of a minor, deaf or imbecile – is one obligated to cover the blood? If they slaughteredย a mother/offspring, can one slaughter the offspring/mother on that same day? If one slaughters many animals, is one obligated to cover the blood after each slaughter or at the end? If one slaughtered birds and animals, does one need to cover the blood in between the animals and birds or only at the end of all of the slaughters.


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ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืงืืžืจ ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืฆื ื ื—ื•ืจ ื“ืœืื• ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ื”ื™ื ื›ืœืœ ืื‘ืœ ืฆื ื˜ืจื•ืฃ ืื™ืžื ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืฉืื™ื ื” ืจืื•ื™ื” ืฉืžื” ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ื•ืœื™ื‘ืขื™ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืงื ืžืฉืžืข ืœืŸ ื›ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื

The Gemara responds: Rav Dimi is speaking utilizing the style of: It is not necessary. That is, it is not necessary to teach: Go out and tear loose, since it is obvious that this is not considered slaughter at all and one is not required to cover the blood. But with regard to the instruction: Go out and render the bird a tereifa, I would say that an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is nevertheless considered an act of slaughter, and the blood of this bird should require covering. Therefore, Rav Dimi teaches us in accordance with the statement of Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba (85a), that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi holds with regard to the mitzva of covering the blood that an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is not considered an act of slaughter, and one is therefore not required to cover the blood of this bird.

ื•ืœืžืืŸ ื“ืืžืจ ืฆื ื ื—ื•ืจ ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื ืœื ืืžืจ ืฆื ื˜ืจื•ืฃ ื•ื›ื™ ืชื™ืžื ืงืกื‘ืจ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืฉืื™ื ื” ืจืื•ื™ื” ืฉืžื” ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ื•ื”ื ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ ืจืื” ืจื‘ื™ ื“ื‘ืจื™ื• ืฉืœ ืจื‘ื™ ืฉืžืขื•ืŸ ื‘ื›ืกื•ื™ ื”ื“ื ื•ืฉื ืื• ื‘ืœืฉื•ืŸ ื—ื›ืžื™ื

The Gemara asks: And according to the one who says that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi said to Rabbi แธคiyya: Go out and tear loose the windpipe and gullet, what is the reason Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi did not say: Go out and render the bird a tereifa? And if you would say the reason is because Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi holds that an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is considered an act of slaughter, and one would be required to cover the blood, this is untenable. As doesnโ€™t Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba say that Rabbi Yoแธฅanan says: Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi saw as correct the statement of Rabbi Shimon, that an ineffective slaughter is not considered an act of slaughter with regard to the mitzva of covering the blood, and taught it in the mishna here using the term: The Rabbis?

ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืงืืžืจ ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืฆื ื˜ืจื•ืฃ ื“ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืฉืื™ื ื” ืจืื•ื™ื” ืœื ืฉืžื” ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืื‘ืœ ืฆื ื ื—ื•ืจ ืื™ืžื ืื™ืŸ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืœืขื•ืฃ ืžืŸ ื”ืชื•ืจื” ื•ื ื—ื™ืจืชื• ื–ื• ื”ื™ื ืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชื• ื•ืœื™ื‘ืขื™ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืงื ืžืฉืžืข ืœืŸ ื›ืืฉืจ ืฆื•ื™ืชืš

The Gemara responds: Ravin is speaking utilizing the style of: It is not necessary. That is, it is not necessary to teach: Go out and render the bird a tereifa, since an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is not considered slaughter and one would not be required to cover the blood of the bird. But with regard to the instruction: Go out and tear loose the windpipe and gullet, I would say that the slaughter of a bird is not obligatory by Torah law to render it permitted for consumption, and consequently, the tearing loose of its windpipe and gullet is considered its slaughter and the blood of this bird should require covering. Therefore, Ravin teaches us that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi holds that the slaughter of a bird is obligatory by Torah law, as he himself derives from the verse: โ€œAs I have commanded youโ€ (Deuteronomy 12:21).

ื•ืžื™ ื ืคืœ ืœื™ื” ื™ืื ื™ื‘ื ื‘ื›ื™ืชื ื™ื” ื•ื”ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ืŸ ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ื•ืืžืจื™ ืœื” ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ืื‘ื™ืŸ ื‘ืจ ืฉื‘ื ืžืฉืขืœื• ื‘ื ื™ ื”ื’ื•ืœื” ืคืกืงื• ื”ื–ื™ืงื™ืŸ ื•ื”ื–ื•ืขื•ืช ื•ื”ืจื•ื—ื•ืช ื•ื”ืจืขืžื™ื ื•ืœื ื”ื—ืžื™ืฅ ื™ื™ื ื ื•ืœื ืœืงื” ืคืฉืชื ื ื•ื ืชื ื• ื—ื›ืžื™ื ืขื™ื ื™ื”ื ื‘ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื•ื‘ื ื™ื•

ยง The Gemara questions the very occurrence of the incident involving Rabbi แธคiyya: And could moths have infested his flax? But doesnโ€™t Ravin bar Abba say, and some say Rabbi Avin bar Sheva says: From when the people of the Exile ascended from Babylonia to Eretz Yisrael there ceased to be meteors, earthquakes, storm winds, and thunder; and their wine did not sour, and their flax was not stricken with an infestation of moths; and the Sages placed their eyes, i.e., attributed these phenomena, to the merit of Rabbi แธคiyya and his sons, who ascended from Babylonia? If so, how was Rabbi แธคiyyaโ€™s flax affected?

ื›ื™ ืžื”ื ื™ื ื–ื›ื•ืชื™ื™ื”ื• ืืขืœืžื ืื“ื™ื“ื”ื• ืœื ื›ื“ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื“ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื‘ื›ืœ ื™ื•ื ื•ื™ื•ื ื‘ืช ืงื•ืœ ื™ื•ืฆืืช ื•ืื•ืžืจืช ื›ืœ ื”ืขื•ืœื ื›ื•ืœื• ื ื™ื–ื•ืŸ ื‘ืฉื‘ื™ืœ ื—ื ื™ื ื ื‘ื ื™ ื•ื—ื ื™ื ื ื‘ื ื™ ื“ื™ ืœื• ื‘ืงื‘ ื—ืจื•ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžืขืจื‘ ืฉื‘ืช ืœืขืจื‘ ืฉื‘ืช

The Gemara responds: When their merit is effective, it is effective for the rest of the world but not for themselves. And this is in accordance with the statement that Rav Yehuda says in the name of Rav, as Rav Yehuda says that Rav says: Each and every day a Divine Voice emerges and says: The entire world is sustained in the merit of แธคanina ben Dosa, My son, and yet for แธคanina, My son, a kav of carobs, i.e., a very small amount of inferior food, is sufficient to sustain him from one Shabbat eve to the next Shabbat eve. Similarly, the merit of Rabbi แธคiyya and his sons was effective for others but not for themselves.

ืžืชื ื™ืณ ื—ืจืฉ ืฉื•ื˜ื” ื•ืงื˜ืŸ ืฉืฉื—ื˜ื• ื•ืื—ืจื™ื ืจื•ืื™ืŸ ืื•ืชื ื—ื™ื™ื‘ ืœื›ืกื•ืช ื‘ื™ื ืŸ ืœื‘ื™ืŸ ืขืฆืžืŸ ืคื˜ื•ืจ ืžืœื›ืกื•ืช

MISHNA: In the case of a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor who slaughtered an undomesticated animal or a bird, and others saw them and ensured that the slaughter was properly performed, in which case the slaughter is valid (see 2a), one who oversaw the slaughter is obligated to cover the blood. If they slaughtered the animals among themselves without supervision, one is exempt from the obligation to cover the blood.

ื•ื›ืŸ ืœืขื ื™ืŸ ืื•ืชื• ื•ืืช ื‘ื ื• ืฉืฉื—ื˜ื• ื•ืื—ืจื™ื ืจื•ืื™ืŸ ืื•ืชืŸ ืืกื•ืจ ืœืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืื—ืจื™ื”ื ื‘ื™ื ืŸ ืœื‘ื™ืŸ ืขืฆืžืŸ ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืžืชื™ืจ ืœืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืื—ืจื™ื”ืŸ ื•ื—ื›ืžื™ื ืื•ืกืจื™ื ื•ืžื•ื“ื™ื ืฉืื ืฉื—ื˜ ืฉืื™ื ื• ืกื•ืคื’ ืืช ื”ืืจื‘ืขื™ื

And likewise with regard to the matter of slaughtering a mother and its offspring on the same day, if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered an undomesticated mother animal and others saw them, it is prohibited to slaughter its offspring after them. If they slaughtered the mother animal among themselves, Rabbi Meir deems it permitted to slaughter its offspring after them and the Rabbis deem it prohibited. And the Rabbis concede that if one slaughtered the offspring thereafter that he does not incur the forty lashes, as it is possible the mother was not properly slaughtered.

ื’ืžืณ ื•ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืžืื™ ืฉื ื ืจื™ืฉื ื“ืœื ืคืœื™ื’ื™ ื•ืžืื™ ืฉื ื ืกื™ืคื ื“ืคืœื™ื’ื™

GEMARA: The Gemara asks: And as for the Rabbis, what is different about the first clause of the mishna that discusses the covering of the blood, where they do not disagree with the statement that if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered an animal without supervision one is exempt from the obligation to cover the blood, which indicates the Rabbis hold that such an act of slaughter is not considered an act of slaughter; and what is different about the latter clause of the mishna that discusses the prohibition against slaughtering a mother and its offspring on the same day, where they disagree with Rabbi Meir and hold that if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered a mother animal without supervision one is prohibited to subsequently slaughter its offspring, indicating they hold that such an act of slaughter is in fact considered an act of slaughter?

ืจื™ืฉื ืื™ ืืžืจื™ื ืŸ ื—ื™ื™ื‘ื™ืŸ ืœื›ืกื•ืช ืืžืจื™ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืžืขืœื™ื™ืชื ื”ื™ื ื•ืืชื™ ืœืžื™ื›ืœ ืžืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชืŸ

The Gemara responds: Actually, it is uncertain whether this slaughter is valid or not. With regard to the first clause, if we say one is obligated to cover the blood from an unsupervised slaughter, people might say this is because the slaughter performed by these people is proper, and they will come to eat meat from their slaughter, and it is in fact forbidden to eat from their slaughter. Therefore, the Rabbis did not require the covering of the blood.

ืกื™ืคื ื ืžื™ ื›ื™ื•ืŸ ื“ืงืืžืจื™ ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืืกื•ืจ ืœืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืื—ืจื™ื”ื ืืžืจื™ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืžืขืœื™ื™ืชื ื”ื™ื ื•ืืชื™ ืœืžื™ื›ืœ ืžืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชืŸ

The Gemara challenges: If so, then with regard to the latter clause of the mishna as well, since the Rabbis say it is prohibited to slaughter the offspring of the mother after them, people might say this is because the slaughter performed by these people is proper, and they will come to eat meat from their slaughter.

ืกื™ืคื ืืžืจื™ ื‘ืฉืจื ื“ืœื ืงื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืœื™ื” ืจื™ืฉื ื ืžื™ ืืžืจื™ ืœื ืงืจ ื—ืฆื™ืจื• ื”ื•ื ืฆืจื™ืš

The Gemara rejects this: With regard to the latter clause, prohibiting the slaughter of the offspring will not cause people to conclude the unsupervised slaughter of the mother by disqualified people was valid. Rather, they will say: The reason the offspring is not slaughtered is because the owner does not need the meat. The Gemara asks: But with regard to the first clause as well, covering the blood will not lead one to conclude that the unsupervised slaughter was valid, as people will say: He is covering the blood because he needs to clean his courtyard of the blood. If so, let the Rabbis deem one obligated to cover the blood.

ืฉื—ื˜ ื‘ืืฉืคื” ืžืื™ ืื™ื›ื ืœืžื™ืžืจ ื‘ื ืœื™ืžืœืš ืžืื™ ืื™ื›ื ืœืžื™ืžืจ

The Gemara rejects this: But if a disqualified person slaughtered the animal in a garbage dump, what can be said to allow the covering of the blood? Obviously, people will not assume one covers the blood in order to clean a garbage dump. Similarly, if one comes to consult the court, what can be said? That is, if one sees from a distance that a disqualified person slaughtered an animal and the blood is uncovered, and he comes to consult the court with regard to the obligation to cover the blood, if the court tells him to cover the blood he might conclude that this is because the unsupervised slaughter was valid. Accordingly, since there are scenarios in which one might mistakenly conclude that the unsupervised slaughter of inept people is valid, the Rabbis concede that one is exempt from covering the blood of such an act of slaughter in all cases.

ื•ืœื™ื˜ืขืžื™ืš ืกื™ืคื ื ืžื™ ื‘ื ืœื™ืžืœืš ืžืื™ ืื™ื›ื ืœืžื™ืžืจ

The Gemara asks: But according to your reasoning that the Rabbis are concerned for the aforementioned scenarios, then with regard to the latter clause as well, if one comes to consult the court with regard to the slaughter of the offspring, what can be said? That is, if one sees a disqualified person slaughter the mother, and he comes to ask the court whether he may slaughter the offspring on the same day, if the court prohibits him from slaughtering it he might conclude that this is because the slaughter of the mother was valid. Why, then, do the Rabbis prohibit one from slaughtering the offspring?

ืืœื ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืื›ื•ืœื” ืžื™ืœืชื ืคืœื™ื’ื™ ื•ื ื˜ืจื™ ืœื™ื” ืœืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืขื“ ื“ืžืกื™ืง ืœื” ืœืžื™ืœืชื ื•ื”ื“ืจ ืคืœื™ื’ื™ ืขื™ืœื•ื™ื”

The Gemara concludes: Rather, it must be that the Rabbis disagree concerning the entire matter, i.e., they disagree with regard to covering the blood as well, and hold that if a disqualified person slaughtered an animal while unsupervised, one must cover the blood; and the Rabbis waited for Rabbi Meir until he concluded his statement, and then they disagreed with him on both accounts.

ื‘ืฉืœืžื ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืœื—ื•ืžืจื ืืœื ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื

The Gemara asks: If so, granted, the opinion of the Rabbis is understandable, as they consistently rule stringently. That is, although it is prohibited to consume the meat of an unsupervised slaughter performed by a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor, the Rabbis require one to cover the blood and prohibit one to slaughter the offspring, due to concern that the person may have performed a valid slaughter. But with regard to the opinion of Rabbi Meir that one is exempt from covering the blood and that one may slaughter the offspring on the same day, what is the reason he does not rule stringently due to uncertainty?

ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ืขืงื‘ ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ ืžื—ื™ื™ื‘ ื”ื™ื” ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืขืœ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชืŸ ืžืฉื•ื ื ื‘ืœื” ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ืืžื™ ื”ื•ืื™ืœ ื•ืจื•ื‘ ืžืขืฉื™ื”ืŸ ืžืงื•ืœืงืœื™ื

Rabbi Yaโ€™akov says that Rabbi Yoแธฅanan says: Rabbi Meir would deem one liable to receive lashes for eating from the slaughter of a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor, due to violation of the prohibition against eating from an animal carcass. According to Rabbi Meir there is no uncertainty with regard to such slaughter, and it is not considered an act of slaughter at all. Consequently, one may become liable to receive lashes for its consumption. The Gemara asks: What is the reason? Rabbi Ami says: Since the majority of actions of a deaf-mute, imbecile, and a minor are bungled, i.e., they are performed incompetently, it can be assumed that their slaughter was performed improperly as well.

ืืžืจ ืœื™ื” ืจื‘ ืคืคื ืœืจื‘ ื”ื•ื ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ืฉืข ื•ืืžืจื™ ืœื” ืจื‘ ื”ื•ื ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ืฉืข ืœืจื‘ ืคืคื ืžืื™ ืื™ืจื™ื ืจื•ื‘ ืืคื™ืœื• ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ ื ืžื™ ื“ื”ื ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ื—ื™ื™ืฉ ืœืžื™ืขื•ื˜ื ืกืžื•ืš ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ื ืœื—ื–ืงื” ื•ืืชืจืข ืœื™ื” ืจื•ื‘ื

Rav Pappa said to Rav Huna, son of Rav Yehoshua, and some say that Rav Huna, son of Rav Yehoshua, said to Rav Pappa: Why did Rabbi Ami specifically state that the reasoning of Rabbi Meir is based on the assumption that the majority of their actions are bungled? Even if only a minority of their actions are bungled and the majority are performed competently, Rabbi Meir would also maintain that the animal is considered a carcass, as Rabbi Meir is concerned for a minority when it can be combined with a presumptive status. If so, append the minority to the presumptive status of an animal prior to its slaughter, i.e., that it is prohibited for consumption, and the majority of competent acts of slaughter is thereby weakened.

ื“ืชื ืŸ ืชื™ื ื•ืง ืฉื ืžืฆื ื‘ืฆื“ ื”ืขื™ืกื” ื•ื‘ืฆืง ื‘ื™ื“ื• ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืžื˜ื”ืจ ื•ื—ื›ืžื™ื ืžื˜ืžืื™ืŸ ืžืคื ื™ ืฉื“ืจื›ื• ืฉืœ ืชื™ื ื•ืง ืœื˜ืคื— ื•ืืžืจื™ื ืŸ ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื ื“ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืงืกื‘ืจ ืจื•ื‘ ืชื™ื ื•ืงื•ืช ืžื˜ืคื—ื™ืŸ ื•ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ ืื™ืŸ ืžื˜ืคื—ื™ืŸ ื•ืขื™ืกื” ื–ื• ื‘ื—ื–ืงืช ื˜ื”ืจื” ืขื•ืžื“ืช

The Gemara proves that Rabbi Meir is concerned for the minority: As we learned in a mishna (Teharot 3:8): In the case of a ritually impure child who is found alongside ritually pure started dough, and he has risen dough in his hand that may have been removed from the larger portion of started dough, Rabbi Meir deems the started dough pure. This is because there is no proof the child touched it; he might have been given the piece by someone else. And the Rabbis deem it impure, as they assume he touched the started dough. The child is presumed to be impure because it is the manner of a child to handle items. And we say with regard to this mishna: What is the reasoning of Rabbi Meir? He holds that a majority of children handle items, in this case the dough, that are within reach, and a minority do not handle items within reach, and the dough itself retains a presumptive status of purity since its impurity has not been definitively determined.

ืกืžื•ืš ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ื ืœื—ื–ืงื” ื•ืื™ืชืจืข ืœื™ื” ืจื•ื‘ื

One appends the minority of children who do not handle items within reach to the presumptive status of purity of the dough, and consequently the force of the majority of children who handle items within reach is weakened. Therefore, the dough is considered pure. Similarly, with regard to slaughter performed by inept people, why does Rabbi Ami state that the reason behind Rabbi Meirโ€™s opinion is due to a majority? Let even a minority of bungled acts of slaughter join with the presumptive prohibited status of the animal to render this animal a carcass.

ืื ืืžืจื• ืกืคืง ื˜ื•ืžืื” ืœื˜ื”ืจ ื™ืืžืจื• ืกืคืง ืื™ืกื•ืจ ืœื”ืชื™ืจ

The Gemara responds that the two cases are not comparable: If they said one may append the minority to the presumptive status with regard to a case of uncertain ritual impurity in order to render the dough pure, will they say that one may rely on a minority in the case of an uncertain prohibition in order to permit it? In other words, without the fact that a majority of the acts of slaughter of a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor are bungled, Rabbi Meir could neither deem one exempt from covering the blood nor allow one to slaughter the offspring immediately. Consequently, it is due only to the majority that Rabbi Meir deems one liable for violation of the prohibition against consuming an animal carcass when consuming meat from their slaughter.

ื”ื•ืจื” ืจื‘ื™ ื›ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ื•ื”ื•ืจื” ืจื‘ื™ ื›ื—ื›ืžื™ื ื”ื™ ืžื™ื ื™ื™ื”ื• ื“ืื—ืจื™ืชื

ยง With regard to the dispute in the mishna, the Gemara notes: Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi ruled in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Meir, who held that if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered a mother animal, one may subsequently slaughter its offspring; and Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi also ruled in accordance with the opinion of the Rabbis, who held that it is prohibited to slaughter it. The Gemara asks: Which of these two rulings is the later, definitive ruling, and which ruling is the retracted one?

ืชื ืฉืžืข ื“ืจื‘ื™ ืื‘ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ื•ืจื‘ื™ ื–ื™ืจื ื”ื•ื• ืงื™ื™ืžื™ ื‘ืฉื•ืงื ื“ืงื™ืกืจื™ ืืคืชื—ื ื“ื‘ื™ ืžื“ืจืฉื ื ืคืง ืจื‘ื™ ืืžื™ ืืฉื›ื—ื™ื ื”ื• ืืžืจ ืœื”ื• ืœืื• ืืžื™ื ื ืœื›ื• ื‘ืขื™ื“ืŸ ื‘ื™ ืžื“ืจืฉื ืœื ืชืงื™ืžื• ืื‘ืจืื™ ื“ื™ืœืžื ืื™ื›ื ืื™ื ืฉ ื“ืžื™ืฆื˜ืจื›ื ืœื™ื” ืฉืžืขืชื ื•ืืชื™ ืœืื™ื˜ืจื•ื“ื™

The Gemara suggests: Come and hear a proof from an incident: Rabbi Abba, son of Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba, and Rabbi Zeira were standing in the marketplace of Caesarea, at the entrance to the study hall. Rabbi Ami exited the study hall and found the two of them standing there. Rabbi Ami said to them: Have I not told you that at the time when the study hall is in session you should not stand outside, as perhaps there is a person inside the study hall who requires clarification of a halakha, and he will become bothered by it because you will not be inside to assist in offering the proper explanation?

ืจื‘ื™ ื–ื™ืจื ืขืœ ืจื‘ื™ ืื‘ื ืœื ืขืœ ื™ืชื‘ื™ ื•ืงื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืœื”ื• ื”ื™ ืžื™ื ื™ื™ื”ื• ืื—ืจื™ืชื ืืžืจ ืœื”ื• ืจื‘ื™ ื–ื™ืจื ืœื ืฉื‘ืงืชื•ืŸ ืœื™ ื“ืื™ืฉื™ื™ืœื™ื” ืœืกื‘ื ื“ื™ืœืžื ืฉืžื™ืข ืœื™ื” ืžืื‘ื•ื” ื•ืื‘ื•ื” ืžื™ื ื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ื›ืœ ืชืœืชื™ืŸ ื™ื•ืžื™ืŸ ืงื ืžื”ื“ืจ ืชืœืžื•ื“ื™ื” ืงืžื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ

Rabbi Zeira entered the study hall, whereas Rabbi Abba did not enter. The students were sitting and raising a dilemma: Which of Rabbi Yehuda HaNasiโ€™s two rulings is the later one? Rabbi Zeira said to them: You did not let me know that this is your dilemma while I was outside, which would have allowed me to ask the elder one, i.e., Rabbi Abba, son of Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba, since perhaps he heard the answer from his father, Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba. And perhaps his father heard it from Rabbi Yoแธฅanan, as Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba would review his studies in front of Rabbi Yoแธฅanan every thirty days.

ืžืื™ ื”ื•ื™ ืขืœื” ืชื ืฉืžืข ื“ืฉืœื— ืจื‘ื™ ืืœืขื–ืจ ืœื’ื•ืœื” ื”ื•ืจื” ืจื‘ื™ ื›ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ื•ื”ื ื›ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื ืžื™ ืื•ืจื™ ืืœื ืœืื• ืฉืžืข ืžื™ื ื” ื”ื ื“ืื—ืจื™ืชื ืฉืžืข ืžื™ื ื”

The Gemara asks: What conclusion was reached about it? The Gemara suggests: Come and hear a proof: Rabbi Elazar sent a message to the Jews in exile, i.e., Babylonia: Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi ruled in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Meir. The Gemara challenges: But Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi also ruled in accordance with the opinion of the Rabbis. Why did Rabbi Elazar disregard that ruling? The Gemara concludes: Rather, isnโ€™t it correct to conclude from Rabbi Elazarโ€™s message that this ruling of Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi, which is in accordance with Rabbi Meir, is the later one? The Gemara affirms: One may in fact conclude from here that this is so.

ืžืชื ื™ืณ ืฉื—ื˜ ืžืื” ื—ื™ื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ืžืื” ืขื•ืคื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ื—ื™ื” ื•ืขื•ืฃ ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืื•ืžืจ ืฉื—ื˜ ื—ื™ื” ื™ื›ืกื ื” ื•ืื—ืจ ื›ืš ื™ืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืืช ื”ืขื•ืฃ

MISHNA: If one slaughtered one hundred undomesticated animals in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the animals and there is no obligation to cover the blood of each animal separately. Likewise, if one slaughtered one hundred birds in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the birds. If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal and a bird in one place, one covering for all of the blood is sufficient. Rabbi Yehuda says: If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal, he should cover its blood immediately and only thereafter he should slaughter the bird.

ื’ืžืณ ืชื ื• ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื—ื™ื” ื›ืœ ืžืฉืžืข ื—ื™ื” ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžืจื•ื‘ื” ื•ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžื•ืขื˜ืช ืขื•ืฃ ื›ืœ ืžืฉืžืข ืขื•ืฃ ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžืจื•ื‘ื” ื•ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžื•ืขื˜ ืžื›ืืŸ ืืžืจื• ืฉื—ื˜ ืžืื” ื—ื™ื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ืžืื” ืขื•ืคื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ื—ื™ื” ื•ืขื•ืฃ ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ

GEMARA: The Sages taught in a baraita: The verse states with regard to the mitzva of covering the blood: โ€œAn undomesticated animal or birdโ€ (Leviticus 17:13). โ€œUndomesticated animalโ€ is inclusive, i.e., any number of animals is included in the term undomesticated animal, whether many or few. Likewise, โ€œbirdโ€ is inclusive, i.e., any amount is included in the term bird, whether many or few. From here the Rabbis stated: If one slaughtered one hundred undomesticated animals in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the animals. Likewise, if one slaughtered one hundred birds in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the birds. If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal and a bird in one place, one covering for all of the blood is sufficient.

ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืื•ืžืจ ืฉื—ื˜ ื—ื™ื” ื™ื›ืกื ื” ื•ืื—ืจ ื›ืš ื™ืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืืช ื”ืขื•ืฃ ืฉื ืืžืจ ื—ื™ื” ืื• ืขื•ืฃ

The baraita continues: Rabbi Yehuda says: If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal, he should cover its blood immediately and only thereafter he should slaughter the bird, as it is stated: โ€œAn undomesticated animal or birdโ€ (Leviticus 17:13). The term โ€œorโ€ indicates that each type must be attended to separately.

ืืžืจื• ืœื• ื”ืจื™ ื”ื•ื ืื•ืžืจ ื›ื™ ื ืคืฉ ื›ืœ ื‘ืฉืจ ื“ืžื• ื‘ื ืคืฉื• ื”ื•ื ืžืื™ ืงื ืžื”ื“ืจื™ ืœื™ื” ื”ื›ื™ ืงืืžืจื™ ืœื™ื” ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื”ืื™ ืื• ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ ืœื™ื” ืœื—ืœืง

The Rabbis said to Rabbi Yehuda: But the next verse states: โ€œFor as to the life of all flesh, the blood thereof is all one with the life thereof.โ€ The Gemara asks: What are the Rabbis responding to Rabbi Yehuda with this statement? The Gemara explains: This is what the Rabbis are saying to him: This term โ€œorโ€ that interposes between an undomesticated animal and a bird is needed to separate them, in order to indicate that the obligation to cover the blood applies after slaughtering either an undomesticated animal or a bird. If not for the term โ€œorโ€ one might have thought the obligation to cover the blood takes effect only after slaughtering both an undomesticated animal and a bird. Accordingly, one cannot derive from this term that the blood of an undomesticated animal and a bird must be covered separately.

ื•ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืœื—ืœืง ืžื“ืžื• ื ืคืงื ื•ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื“ืžื• ื˜ื•ื‘ื ืžืฉืžืข ื“ื›ืชื™ื‘ ื›ื™ ื ืคืฉ ื›ืœ ื‘ืฉืจ ื“ืžื• ื‘ื ืคืฉื• ื”ื•ื

And Rabbi Yehuda responds to this: The source for separating the obligations with regard to an undomesticated animal and a bird is derived from the verse: โ€œAnd he shall pour out its bloodโ€ (Leviticus 17:13). The verse makes reference to the blood of only one animal, indicating that the obligation applies after slaughtering either a bird or an undomesticated animal. And the Rabbis respond that โ€œits bloodโ€ also indicates many, as the term: Blood, can refer to any amount of blood. This is demonstrated by that which is written: โ€œFor as to the life of all flesh, the blood thereof is all one with the life thereofโ€ (Leviticus 17:14).

ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื ื™ื ื ืžื•ื“ื” ื”ื™ื” ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืœืขื ื™ืŸ ื‘ืจื›ื” ืฉืื™ื ื• ืžื‘ืจืš ืืœื ื‘ืจื›ื” ืื—ืช ืืžืจ ืœื™ื” ืจื‘ื™ื ื ืœืจื‘ ืื—ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื ื•ืืžืจื™ ืœื” ืจื‘ ืื—ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื ืœืจื‘ ืืฉื™ ืžืื™ ืฉื ื ืžืชืœืžื™ื“ื™ ื“ืจื‘

ยง Rabbi แธคanina says: Although Rabbi Yehuda holds that one first covers the blood of an undomesticated animal before slaughtering the bird, Rabbi Yehuda would concede with regard to the matter of the blessing over their slaughter, i.e., that one recites only one blessing. The Gemara questions this assertion: Ravina said to Rav Aแธฅa, son of Rava, and some say that Rav Aแธฅa, son of Rava, said to Rav Ashi: In what way is this case different from the incident that occurred with the students of Rav?

ื“ืจื‘ ื‘ืจื•ื ื ื•ืจื‘ ื—ื ื ืืœ ืชืœืžื™ื“ื™ ื“ืจื‘ ื”ื•ื• ื™ืชื‘ื™ ื‘ืกืขื•ื“ืชื ืงืื™ ืขืœื™ื™ื”ื• ืจื‘ ื™ื™ื‘ื ืกื‘ื ืืžืจื• ืœื™ื” ื”ื‘ ืœื™ื‘ืจื™ืš ื”ื“ื•ืจ ืืžืจื• ืœื™ื” ื”ื‘ ืœื™ืฉืชื™ ืืžืจ ืœื”ื• ืจื‘ ื™ื™ื‘ื ืกื‘ื ื”ื›ื™ ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื›ื™ื•ืŸ ื“ืืžืจ ื”ื‘ ืœื™ื‘ืจื™ืš ืื™ืชืกืจ ืœื™ื” ืœืžืฉืชื™ ื—ืžืจื ื”ื›ื ื ืžื™ ื›ื™ื•ืŸ ื“ืื™ื˜ืคืœ ืœื™ื” ืœื›ืกื•ื™ ืื™ื—ื™ื™ื‘ ืœื™ื” ืœื‘ืจื›ื”

As it occurred that Rav Beruna and Rav แธคananel, the students of Rav, were sitting together at a meal, and Rav Yeiva the Elder stood over them to serve them. They said to him: Give us a cup of wine over which to recite the blessings of Grace after Meals. They then changed their mind and said to him: Give us a cup of wine to drink. Rav Yeiva the Elder said to them that this is what Rav said: Once someone at a meal says: Give me a cup over which to recite the blessings of Grace after Meals, it is prohibited for him to drink any more wine, since he has expressed his desire to conclude his meal. If he now wishes to drink more wine, he must recite a blessing before drinking it. Ravina asks: Here too, since he is required to cover the blood of the undomesticated animal before slaughtering the bird, there is an interruption between the acts of slaughter, and he has therefore become obligated to recite a new blessing before slaughtering the bird.

  • This month's learning is sponsored by Ron and Shira Krebs to commemorate the 73rd yahrzeit of Shira's grandfather (Yitzchak Leib Ben David Ber HaCohen v'Malka), the 1st yahrzeit of Shira's father (Gershon Pinya Ben Yitzchak Leib HaCohen v'Menucha Sara), and the bar mitzvah of their son Eytan who will be making a siyum on Mishna Shas this month.

  • This month's learning is sponsored for the refuah shleima of Naama bat Yael Esther.

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Chullin 86

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Chullin 86

ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืงืืžืจ ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืฆื ื ื—ื•ืจ ื“ืœืื• ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ื”ื™ื ื›ืœืœ ืื‘ืœ ืฆื ื˜ืจื•ืฃ ืื™ืžื ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืฉืื™ื ื” ืจืื•ื™ื” ืฉืžื” ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ื•ืœื™ื‘ืขื™ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืงื ืžืฉืžืข ืœืŸ ื›ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื

The Gemara responds: Rav Dimi is speaking utilizing the style of: It is not necessary. That is, it is not necessary to teach: Go out and tear loose, since it is obvious that this is not considered slaughter at all and one is not required to cover the blood. But with regard to the instruction: Go out and render the bird a tereifa, I would say that an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is nevertheless considered an act of slaughter, and the blood of this bird should require covering. Therefore, Rav Dimi teaches us in accordance with the statement of Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba (85a), that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi holds with regard to the mitzva of covering the blood that an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is not considered an act of slaughter, and one is therefore not required to cover the blood of this bird.

ื•ืœืžืืŸ ื“ืืžืจ ืฆื ื ื—ื•ืจ ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื ืœื ืืžืจ ืฆื ื˜ืจื•ืฃ ื•ื›ื™ ืชื™ืžื ืงืกื‘ืจ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืฉืื™ื ื” ืจืื•ื™ื” ืฉืžื” ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ื•ื”ื ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ ืจืื” ืจื‘ื™ ื“ื‘ืจื™ื• ืฉืœ ืจื‘ื™ ืฉืžืขื•ืŸ ื‘ื›ืกื•ื™ ื”ื“ื ื•ืฉื ืื• ื‘ืœืฉื•ืŸ ื—ื›ืžื™ื

The Gemara asks: And according to the one who says that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi said to Rabbi แธคiyya: Go out and tear loose the windpipe and gullet, what is the reason Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi did not say: Go out and render the bird a tereifa? And if you would say the reason is because Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi holds that an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is considered an act of slaughter, and one would be required to cover the blood, this is untenable. As doesnโ€™t Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba say that Rabbi Yoแธฅanan says: Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi saw as correct the statement of Rabbi Shimon, that an ineffective slaughter is not considered an act of slaughter with regard to the mitzva of covering the blood, and taught it in the mishna here using the term: The Rabbis?

ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืงืืžืจ ืœื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืฆื ื˜ืจื•ืฃ ื“ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืฉืื™ื ื” ืจืื•ื™ื” ืœื ืฉืžื” ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืื‘ืœ ืฆื ื ื—ื•ืจ ืื™ืžื ืื™ืŸ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืœืขื•ืฃ ืžืŸ ื”ืชื•ืจื” ื•ื ื—ื™ืจืชื• ื–ื• ื”ื™ื ืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชื• ื•ืœื™ื‘ืขื™ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืงื ืžืฉืžืข ืœืŸ ื›ืืฉืจ ืฆื•ื™ืชืš

The Gemara responds: Ravin is speaking utilizing the style of: It is not necessary. That is, it is not necessary to teach: Go out and render the bird a tereifa, since an act of slaughter that is not fit to render the meat permitted is not considered slaughter and one would not be required to cover the blood of the bird. But with regard to the instruction: Go out and tear loose the windpipe and gullet, I would say that the slaughter of a bird is not obligatory by Torah law to render it permitted for consumption, and consequently, the tearing loose of its windpipe and gullet is considered its slaughter and the blood of this bird should require covering. Therefore, Ravin teaches us that Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi holds that the slaughter of a bird is obligatory by Torah law, as he himself derives from the verse: โ€œAs I have commanded youโ€ (Deuteronomy 12:21).

ื•ืžื™ ื ืคืœ ืœื™ื” ื™ืื ื™ื‘ื ื‘ื›ื™ืชื ื™ื” ื•ื”ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ืŸ ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ื•ืืžืจื™ ืœื” ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ืื‘ื™ืŸ ื‘ืจ ืฉื‘ื ืžืฉืขืœื• ื‘ื ื™ ื”ื’ื•ืœื” ืคืกืงื• ื”ื–ื™ืงื™ืŸ ื•ื”ื–ื•ืขื•ืช ื•ื”ืจื•ื—ื•ืช ื•ื”ืจืขืžื™ื ื•ืœื ื”ื—ืžื™ืฅ ื™ื™ื ื ื•ืœื ืœืงื” ืคืฉืชื ื ื•ื ืชื ื• ื—ื›ืžื™ื ืขื™ื ื™ื”ื ื‘ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื•ื‘ื ื™ื•

ยง The Gemara questions the very occurrence of the incident involving Rabbi แธคiyya: And could moths have infested his flax? But doesnโ€™t Ravin bar Abba say, and some say Rabbi Avin bar Sheva says: From when the people of the Exile ascended from Babylonia to Eretz Yisrael there ceased to be meteors, earthquakes, storm winds, and thunder; and their wine did not sour, and their flax was not stricken with an infestation of moths; and the Sages placed their eyes, i.e., attributed these phenomena, to the merit of Rabbi แธคiyya and his sons, who ascended from Babylonia? If so, how was Rabbi แธคiyyaโ€™s flax affected?

ื›ื™ ืžื”ื ื™ื ื–ื›ื•ืชื™ื™ื”ื• ืืขืœืžื ืื“ื™ื“ื”ื• ืœื ื›ื“ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื“ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื‘ื›ืœ ื™ื•ื ื•ื™ื•ื ื‘ืช ืงื•ืœ ื™ื•ืฆืืช ื•ืื•ืžืจืช ื›ืœ ื”ืขื•ืœื ื›ื•ืœื• ื ื™ื–ื•ืŸ ื‘ืฉื‘ื™ืœ ื—ื ื™ื ื ื‘ื ื™ ื•ื—ื ื™ื ื ื‘ื ื™ ื“ื™ ืœื• ื‘ืงื‘ ื—ืจื•ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžืขืจื‘ ืฉื‘ืช ืœืขืจื‘ ืฉื‘ืช

The Gemara responds: When their merit is effective, it is effective for the rest of the world but not for themselves. And this is in accordance with the statement that Rav Yehuda says in the name of Rav, as Rav Yehuda says that Rav says: Each and every day a Divine Voice emerges and says: The entire world is sustained in the merit of แธคanina ben Dosa, My son, and yet for แธคanina, My son, a kav of carobs, i.e., a very small amount of inferior food, is sufficient to sustain him from one Shabbat eve to the next Shabbat eve. Similarly, the merit of Rabbi แธคiyya and his sons was effective for others but not for themselves.

ืžืชื ื™ืณ ื—ืจืฉ ืฉื•ื˜ื” ื•ืงื˜ืŸ ืฉืฉื—ื˜ื• ื•ืื—ืจื™ื ืจื•ืื™ืŸ ืื•ืชื ื—ื™ื™ื‘ ืœื›ืกื•ืช ื‘ื™ื ืŸ ืœื‘ื™ืŸ ืขืฆืžืŸ ืคื˜ื•ืจ ืžืœื›ืกื•ืช

MISHNA: In the case of a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor who slaughtered an undomesticated animal or a bird, and others saw them and ensured that the slaughter was properly performed, in which case the slaughter is valid (see 2a), one who oversaw the slaughter is obligated to cover the blood. If they slaughtered the animals among themselves without supervision, one is exempt from the obligation to cover the blood.

ื•ื›ืŸ ืœืขื ื™ืŸ ืื•ืชื• ื•ืืช ื‘ื ื• ืฉืฉื—ื˜ื• ื•ืื—ืจื™ื ืจื•ืื™ืŸ ืื•ืชืŸ ืืกื•ืจ ืœืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืื—ืจื™ื”ื ื‘ื™ื ืŸ ืœื‘ื™ืŸ ืขืฆืžืŸ ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืžืชื™ืจ ืœืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืื—ืจื™ื”ืŸ ื•ื—ื›ืžื™ื ืื•ืกืจื™ื ื•ืžื•ื“ื™ื ืฉืื ืฉื—ื˜ ืฉืื™ื ื• ืกื•ืคื’ ืืช ื”ืืจื‘ืขื™ื

And likewise with regard to the matter of slaughtering a mother and its offspring on the same day, if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered an undomesticated mother animal and others saw them, it is prohibited to slaughter its offspring after them. If they slaughtered the mother animal among themselves, Rabbi Meir deems it permitted to slaughter its offspring after them and the Rabbis deem it prohibited. And the Rabbis concede that if one slaughtered the offspring thereafter that he does not incur the forty lashes, as it is possible the mother was not properly slaughtered.

ื’ืžืณ ื•ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืžืื™ ืฉื ื ืจื™ืฉื ื“ืœื ืคืœื™ื’ื™ ื•ืžืื™ ืฉื ื ืกื™ืคื ื“ืคืœื™ื’ื™

GEMARA: The Gemara asks: And as for the Rabbis, what is different about the first clause of the mishna that discusses the covering of the blood, where they do not disagree with the statement that if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered an animal without supervision one is exempt from the obligation to cover the blood, which indicates the Rabbis hold that such an act of slaughter is not considered an act of slaughter; and what is different about the latter clause of the mishna that discusses the prohibition against slaughtering a mother and its offspring on the same day, where they disagree with Rabbi Meir and hold that if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered a mother animal without supervision one is prohibited to subsequently slaughter its offspring, indicating they hold that such an act of slaughter is in fact considered an act of slaughter?

ืจื™ืฉื ืื™ ืืžืจื™ื ืŸ ื—ื™ื™ื‘ื™ืŸ ืœื›ืกื•ืช ืืžืจื™ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืžืขืœื™ื™ืชื ื”ื™ื ื•ืืชื™ ืœืžื™ื›ืœ ืžืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชืŸ

The Gemara responds: Actually, it is uncertain whether this slaughter is valid or not. With regard to the first clause, if we say one is obligated to cover the blood from an unsupervised slaughter, people might say this is because the slaughter performed by these people is proper, and they will come to eat meat from their slaughter, and it is in fact forbidden to eat from their slaughter. Therefore, the Rabbis did not require the covering of the blood.

ืกื™ืคื ื ืžื™ ื›ื™ื•ืŸ ื“ืงืืžืจื™ ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืืกื•ืจ ืœืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืื—ืจื™ื”ื ืืžืจื™ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ื” ืžืขืœื™ื™ืชื ื”ื™ื ื•ืืชื™ ืœืžื™ื›ืœ ืžืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชืŸ

The Gemara challenges: If so, then with regard to the latter clause of the mishna as well, since the Rabbis say it is prohibited to slaughter the offspring of the mother after them, people might say this is because the slaughter performed by these people is proper, and they will come to eat meat from their slaughter.

ืกื™ืคื ืืžืจื™ ื‘ืฉืจื ื“ืœื ืงื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืœื™ื” ืจื™ืฉื ื ืžื™ ืืžืจื™ ืœื ืงืจ ื—ืฆื™ืจื• ื”ื•ื ืฆืจื™ืš

The Gemara rejects this: With regard to the latter clause, prohibiting the slaughter of the offspring will not cause people to conclude the unsupervised slaughter of the mother by disqualified people was valid. Rather, they will say: The reason the offspring is not slaughtered is because the owner does not need the meat. The Gemara asks: But with regard to the first clause as well, covering the blood will not lead one to conclude that the unsupervised slaughter was valid, as people will say: He is covering the blood because he needs to clean his courtyard of the blood. If so, let the Rabbis deem one obligated to cover the blood.

ืฉื—ื˜ ื‘ืืฉืคื” ืžืื™ ืื™ื›ื ืœืžื™ืžืจ ื‘ื ืœื™ืžืœืš ืžืื™ ืื™ื›ื ืœืžื™ืžืจ

The Gemara rejects this: But if a disqualified person slaughtered the animal in a garbage dump, what can be said to allow the covering of the blood? Obviously, people will not assume one covers the blood in order to clean a garbage dump. Similarly, if one comes to consult the court, what can be said? That is, if one sees from a distance that a disqualified person slaughtered an animal and the blood is uncovered, and he comes to consult the court with regard to the obligation to cover the blood, if the court tells him to cover the blood he might conclude that this is because the unsupervised slaughter was valid. Accordingly, since there are scenarios in which one might mistakenly conclude that the unsupervised slaughter of inept people is valid, the Rabbis concede that one is exempt from covering the blood of such an act of slaughter in all cases.

ื•ืœื™ื˜ืขืžื™ืš ืกื™ืคื ื ืžื™ ื‘ื ืœื™ืžืœืš ืžืื™ ืื™ื›ื ืœืžื™ืžืจ

The Gemara asks: But according to your reasoning that the Rabbis are concerned for the aforementioned scenarios, then with regard to the latter clause as well, if one comes to consult the court with regard to the slaughter of the offspring, what can be said? That is, if one sees a disqualified person slaughter the mother, and he comes to ask the court whether he may slaughter the offspring on the same day, if the court prohibits him from slaughtering it he might conclude that this is because the slaughter of the mother was valid. Why, then, do the Rabbis prohibit one from slaughtering the offspring?

ืืœื ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืื›ื•ืœื” ืžื™ืœืชื ืคืœื™ื’ื™ ื•ื ื˜ืจื™ ืœื™ื” ืœืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืขื“ ื“ืžืกื™ืง ืœื” ืœืžื™ืœืชื ื•ื”ื“ืจ ืคืœื™ื’ื™ ืขื™ืœื•ื™ื”

The Gemara concludes: Rather, it must be that the Rabbis disagree concerning the entire matter, i.e., they disagree with regard to covering the blood as well, and hold that if a disqualified person slaughtered an animal while unsupervised, one must cover the blood; and the Rabbis waited for Rabbi Meir until he concluded his statement, and then they disagreed with him on both accounts.

ื‘ืฉืœืžื ืจื‘ื ืŸ ืœื—ื•ืžืจื ืืœื ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื

The Gemara asks: If so, granted, the opinion of the Rabbis is understandable, as they consistently rule stringently. That is, although it is prohibited to consume the meat of an unsupervised slaughter performed by a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor, the Rabbis require one to cover the blood and prohibit one to slaughter the offspring, due to concern that the person may have performed a valid slaughter. But with regard to the opinion of Rabbi Meir that one is exempt from covering the blood and that one may slaughter the offspring on the same day, what is the reason he does not rule stringently due to uncertainty?

ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ืขืงื‘ ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ ืžื—ื™ื™ื‘ ื”ื™ื” ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืขืœ ืฉื—ื™ื˜ืชืŸ ืžืฉื•ื ื ื‘ืœื” ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ืืžื™ ื”ื•ืื™ืœ ื•ืจื•ื‘ ืžืขืฉื™ื”ืŸ ืžืงื•ืœืงืœื™ื

Rabbi Yaโ€™akov says that Rabbi Yoแธฅanan says: Rabbi Meir would deem one liable to receive lashes for eating from the slaughter of a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor, due to violation of the prohibition against eating from an animal carcass. According to Rabbi Meir there is no uncertainty with regard to such slaughter, and it is not considered an act of slaughter at all. Consequently, one may become liable to receive lashes for its consumption. The Gemara asks: What is the reason? Rabbi Ami says: Since the majority of actions of a deaf-mute, imbecile, and a minor are bungled, i.e., they are performed incompetently, it can be assumed that their slaughter was performed improperly as well.

ืืžืจ ืœื™ื” ืจื‘ ืคืคื ืœืจื‘ ื”ื•ื ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ืฉืข ื•ืืžืจื™ ืœื” ืจื‘ ื”ื•ื ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ ื™ื”ื•ืฉืข ืœืจื‘ ืคืคื ืžืื™ ืื™ืจื™ื ืจื•ื‘ ืืคื™ืœื• ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ ื ืžื™ ื“ื”ื ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ื—ื™ื™ืฉ ืœืžื™ืขื•ื˜ื ืกืžื•ืš ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ื ืœื—ื–ืงื” ื•ืืชืจืข ืœื™ื” ืจื•ื‘ื

Rav Pappa said to Rav Huna, son of Rav Yehoshua, and some say that Rav Huna, son of Rav Yehoshua, said to Rav Pappa: Why did Rabbi Ami specifically state that the reasoning of Rabbi Meir is based on the assumption that the majority of their actions are bungled? Even if only a minority of their actions are bungled and the majority are performed competently, Rabbi Meir would also maintain that the animal is considered a carcass, as Rabbi Meir is concerned for a minority when it can be combined with a presumptive status. If so, append the minority to the presumptive status of an animal prior to its slaughter, i.e., that it is prohibited for consumption, and the majority of competent acts of slaughter is thereby weakened.

ื“ืชื ืŸ ืชื™ื ื•ืง ืฉื ืžืฆื ื‘ืฆื“ ื”ืขื™ืกื” ื•ื‘ืฆืง ื‘ื™ื“ื• ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืžื˜ื”ืจ ื•ื—ื›ืžื™ื ืžื˜ืžืื™ืŸ ืžืคื ื™ ืฉื“ืจื›ื• ืฉืœ ืชื™ื ื•ืง ืœื˜ืคื— ื•ืืžืจื™ื ืŸ ืžืื™ ื˜ืขืžื ื“ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ืงืกื‘ืจ ืจื•ื‘ ืชื™ื ื•ืงื•ืช ืžื˜ืคื—ื™ืŸ ื•ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ ืื™ืŸ ืžื˜ืคื—ื™ืŸ ื•ืขื™ืกื” ื–ื• ื‘ื—ื–ืงืช ื˜ื”ืจื” ืขื•ืžื“ืช

The Gemara proves that Rabbi Meir is concerned for the minority: As we learned in a mishna (Teharot 3:8): In the case of a ritually impure child who is found alongside ritually pure started dough, and he has risen dough in his hand that may have been removed from the larger portion of started dough, Rabbi Meir deems the started dough pure. This is because there is no proof the child touched it; he might have been given the piece by someone else. And the Rabbis deem it impure, as they assume he touched the started dough. The child is presumed to be impure because it is the manner of a child to handle items. And we say with regard to this mishna: What is the reasoning of Rabbi Meir? He holds that a majority of children handle items, in this case the dough, that are within reach, and a minority do not handle items within reach, and the dough itself retains a presumptive status of purity since its impurity has not been definitively determined.

ืกืžื•ืš ืžื™ืขื•ื˜ื ืœื—ื–ืงื” ื•ืื™ืชืจืข ืœื™ื” ืจื•ื‘ื

One appends the minority of children who do not handle items within reach to the presumptive status of purity of the dough, and consequently the force of the majority of children who handle items within reach is weakened. Therefore, the dough is considered pure. Similarly, with regard to slaughter performed by inept people, why does Rabbi Ami state that the reason behind Rabbi Meirโ€™s opinion is due to a majority? Let even a minority of bungled acts of slaughter join with the presumptive prohibited status of the animal to render this animal a carcass.

ืื ืืžืจื• ืกืคืง ื˜ื•ืžืื” ืœื˜ื”ืจ ื™ืืžืจื• ืกืคืง ืื™ืกื•ืจ ืœื”ืชื™ืจ

The Gemara responds that the two cases are not comparable: If they said one may append the minority to the presumptive status with regard to a case of uncertain ritual impurity in order to render the dough pure, will they say that one may rely on a minority in the case of an uncertain prohibition in order to permit it? In other words, without the fact that a majority of the acts of slaughter of a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor are bungled, Rabbi Meir could neither deem one exempt from covering the blood nor allow one to slaughter the offspring immediately. Consequently, it is due only to the majority that Rabbi Meir deems one liable for violation of the prohibition against consuming an animal carcass when consuming meat from their slaughter.

ื”ื•ืจื” ืจื‘ื™ ื›ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ื•ื”ื•ืจื” ืจื‘ื™ ื›ื—ื›ืžื™ื ื”ื™ ืžื™ื ื™ื™ื”ื• ื“ืื—ืจื™ืชื

ยง With regard to the dispute in the mishna, the Gemara notes: Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi ruled in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Meir, who held that if a deaf-mute, an imbecile, or a minor slaughtered a mother animal, one may subsequently slaughter its offspring; and Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi also ruled in accordance with the opinion of the Rabbis, who held that it is prohibited to slaughter it. The Gemara asks: Which of these two rulings is the later, definitive ruling, and which ruling is the retracted one?

ืชื ืฉืžืข ื“ืจื‘ื™ ืื‘ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ื•ืจื‘ื™ ื–ื™ืจื ื”ื•ื• ืงื™ื™ืžื™ ื‘ืฉื•ืงื ื“ืงื™ืกืจื™ ืืคืชื—ื ื“ื‘ื™ ืžื“ืจืฉื ื ืคืง ืจื‘ื™ ืืžื™ ืืฉื›ื—ื™ื ื”ื• ืืžืจ ืœื”ื• ืœืื• ืืžื™ื ื ืœื›ื• ื‘ืขื™ื“ืŸ ื‘ื™ ืžื“ืจืฉื ืœื ืชืงื™ืžื• ืื‘ืจืื™ ื“ื™ืœืžื ืื™ื›ื ืื™ื ืฉ ื“ืžื™ืฆื˜ืจื›ื ืœื™ื” ืฉืžืขืชื ื•ืืชื™ ืœืื™ื˜ืจื•ื“ื™

The Gemara suggests: Come and hear a proof from an incident: Rabbi Abba, son of Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba, and Rabbi Zeira were standing in the marketplace of Caesarea, at the entrance to the study hall. Rabbi Ami exited the study hall and found the two of them standing there. Rabbi Ami said to them: Have I not told you that at the time when the study hall is in session you should not stand outside, as perhaps there is a person inside the study hall who requires clarification of a halakha, and he will become bothered by it because you will not be inside to assist in offering the proper explanation?

ืจื‘ื™ ื–ื™ืจื ืขืœ ืจื‘ื™ ืื‘ื ืœื ืขืœ ื™ืชื‘ื™ ื•ืงื ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ื ืœื”ื• ื”ื™ ืžื™ื ื™ื™ื”ื• ืื—ืจื™ืชื ืืžืจ ืœื”ื• ืจื‘ื™ ื–ื™ืจื ืœื ืฉื‘ืงืชื•ืŸ ืœื™ ื“ืื™ืฉื™ื™ืœื™ื” ืœืกื‘ื ื“ื™ืœืžื ืฉืžื™ืข ืœื™ื” ืžืื‘ื•ื” ื•ืื‘ื•ื” ืžื™ื ื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื™ื™ื ื‘ืจ ืื‘ื ื›ืœ ืชืœืชื™ืŸ ื™ื•ืžื™ืŸ ืงื ืžื”ื“ืจ ืชืœืžื•ื“ื™ื” ืงืžื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื•ื—ื ืŸ

Rabbi Zeira entered the study hall, whereas Rabbi Abba did not enter. The students were sitting and raising a dilemma: Which of Rabbi Yehuda HaNasiโ€™s two rulings is the later one? Rabbi Zeira said to them: You did not let me know that this is your dilemma while I was outside, which would have allowed me to ask the elder one, i.e., Rabbi Abba, son of Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba, since perhaps he heard the answer from his father, Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba. And perhaps his father heard it from Rabbi Yoแธฅanan, as Rabbi แธคiyya bar Abba would review his studies in front of Rabbi Yoแธฅanan every thirty days.

ืžืื™ ื”ื•ื™ ืขืœื” ืชื ืฉืžืข ื“ืฉืœื— ืจื‘ื™ ืืœืขื–ืจ ืœื’ื•ืœื” ื”ื•ืจื” ืจื‘ื™ ื›ืจื‘ื™ ืžืื™ืจ ื•ื”ื ื›ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื ืžื™ ืื•ืจื™ ืืœื ืœืื• ืฉืžืข ืžื™ื ื” ื”ื ื“ืื—ืจื™ืชื ืฉืžืข ืžื™ื ื”

The Gemara asks: What conclusion was reached about it? The Gemara suggests: Come and hear a proof: Rabbi Elazar sent a message to the Jews in exile, i.e., Babylonia: Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi ruled in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Meir. The Gemara challenges: But Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi also ruled in accordance with the opinion of the Rabbis. Why did Rabbi Elazar disregard that ruling? The Gemara concludes: Rather, isnโ€™t it correct to conclude from Rabbi Elazarโ€™s message that this ruling of Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi, which is in accordance with Rabbi Meir, is the later one? The Gemara affirms: One may in fact conclude from here that this is so.

ืžืชื ื™ืณ ืฉื—ื˜ ืžืื” ื—ื™ื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ืžืื” ืขื•ืคื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ื—ื™ื” ื•ืขื•ืฃ ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืื•ืžืจ ืฉื—ื˜ ื—ื™ื” ื™ื›ืกื ื” ื•ืื—ืจ ื›ืš ื™ืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืืช ื”ืขื•ืฃ

MISHNA: If one slaughtered one hundred undomesticated animals in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the animals and there is no obligation to cover the blood of each animal separately. Likewise, if one slaughtered one hundred birds in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the birds. If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal and a bird in one place, one covering for all of the blood is sufficient. Rabbi Yehuda says: If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal, he should cover its blood immediately and only thereafter he should slaughter the bird.

ื’ืžืณ ืชื ื• ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื—ื™ื” ื›ืœ ืžืฉืžืข ื—ื™ื” ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžืจื•ื‘ื” ื•ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžื•ืขื˜ืช ืขื•ืฃ ื›ืœ ืžืฉืžืข ืขื•ืฃ ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžืจื•ื‘ื” ื•ื‘ื™ืŸ ืžื•ืขื˜ ืžื›ืืŸ ืืžืจื• ืฉื—ื˜ ืžืื” ื—ื™ื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ืžืื” ืขื•ืคื•ืช ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ ื—ื™ื” ื•ืขื•ืฃ ื‘ืžืงื•ื ืื—ื“ ื›ืกื•ื™ ืื—ื“ ืœื›ื•ืœืŸ

GEMARA: The Sages taught in a baraita: The verse states with regard to the mitzva of covering the blood: โ€œAn undomesticated animal or birdโ€ (Leviticus 17:13). โ€œUndomesticated animalโ€ is inclusive, i.e., any number of animals is included in the term undomesticated animal, whether many or few. Likewise, โ€œbirdโ€ is inclusive, i.e., any amount is included in the term bird, whether many or few. From here the Rabbis stated: If one slaughtered one hundred undomesticated animals in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the animals. Likewise, if one slaughtered one hundred birds in one place, one covering of the blood suffices for all the birds. If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal and a bird in one place, one covering for all of the blood is sufficient.

ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืื•ืžืจ ืฉื—ื˜ ื—ื™ื” ื™ื›ืกื ื” ื•ืื—ืจ ื›ืš ื™ืฉื—ื•ื˜ ืืช ื”ืขื•ืฃ ืฉื ืืžืจ ื—ื™ื” ืื• ืขื•ืฃ

The baraita continues: Rabbi Yehuda says: If one slaughtered an undomesticated animal, he should cover its blood immediately and only thereafter he should slaughter the bird, as it is stated: โ€œAn undomesticated animal or birdโ€ (Leviticus 17:13). The term โ€œorโ€ indicates that each type must be attended to separately.

ืืžืจื• ืœื• ื”ืจื™ ื”ื•ื ืื•ืžืจ ื›ื™ ื ืคืฉ ื›ืœ ื‘ืฉืจ ื“ืžื• ื‘ื ืคืฉื• ื”ื•ื ืžืื™ ืงื ืžื”ื“ืจื™ ืœื™ื” ื”ื›ื™ ืงืืžืจื™ ืœื™ื” ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื”ืื™ ืื• ืžื™ื‘ืขื™ ืœื™ื” ืœื—ืœืง

The Rabbis said to Rabbi Yehuda: But the next verse states: โ€œFor as to the life of all flesh, the blood thereof is all one with the life thereof.โ€ The Gemara asks: What are the Rabbis responding to Rabbi Yehuda with this statement? The Gemara explains: This is what the Rabbis are saying to him: This term โ€œorโ€ that interposes between an undomesticated animal and a bird is needed to separate them, in order to indicate that the obligation to cover the blood applies after slaughtering either an undomesticated animal or a bird. If not for the term โ€œorโ€ one might have thought the obligation to cover the blood takes effect only after slaughtering both an undomesticated animal and a bird. Accordingly, one cannot derive from this term that the blood of an undomesticated animal and a bird must be covered separately.

ื•ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืœื—ืœืง ืžื“ืžื• ื ืคืงื ื•ืจื‘ื ืŸ ื“ืžื• ื˜ื•ื‘ื ืžืฉืžืข ื“ื›ืชื™ื‘ ื›ื™ ื ืคืฉ ื›ืœ ื‘ืฉืจ ื“ืžื• ื‘ื ืคืฉื• ื”ื•ื

And Rabbi Yehuda responds to this: The source for separating the obligations with regard to an undomesticated animal and a bird is derived from the verse: โ€œAnd he shall pour out its bloodโ€ (Leviticus 17:13). The verse makes reference to the blood of only one animal, indicating that the obligation applies after slaughtering either a bird or an undomesticated animal. And the Rabbis respond that โ€œits bloodโ€ also indicates many, as the term: Blood, can refer to any amount of blood. This is demonstrated by that which is written: โ€œFor as to the life of all flesh, the blood thereof is all one with the life thereofโ€ (Leviticus 17:14).

ืืžืจ ืจื‘ื™ ื—ื ื™ื ื ืžื•ื“ื” ื”ื™ื” ืจื‘ื™ ื™ื”ื•ื“ื” ืœืขื ื™ืŸ ื‘ืจื›ื” ืฉืื™ื ื• ืžื‘ืจืš ืืœื ื‘ืจื›ื” ืื—ืช ืืžืจ ืœื™ื” ืจื‘ื™ื ื ืœืจื‘ ืื—ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื ื•ืืžืจื™ ืœื” ืจื‘ ืื—ื ื‘ืจื™ื” ื“ืจื‘ื ืœืจื‘ ืืฉื™ ืžืื™ ืฉื ื ืžืชืœืžื™ื“ื™ ื“ืจื‘

ยง Rabbi แธคanina says: Although Rabbi Yehuda holds that one first covers the blood of an undomesticated animal before slaughtering the bird, Rabbi Yehuda would concede with regard to the matter of the blessing over their slaughter, i.e., that one recites only one blessing. The Gemara questions this assertion: Ravina said to Rav Aแธฅa, son of Rava, and some say that Rav Aแธฅa, son of Rava, said to Rav Ashi: In what way is this case different from the incident that occurred with the students of Rav?

ื“ืจื‘ ื‘ืจื•ื ื ื•ืจื‘ ื—ื ื ืืœ ืชืœืžื™ื“ื™ ื“ืจื‘ ื”ื•ื• ื™ืชื‘ื™ ื‘ืกืขื•ื“ืชื ืงืื™ ืขืœื™ื™ื”ื• ืจื‘ ื™ื™ื‘ื ืกื‘ื ืืžืจื• ืœื™ื” ื”ื‘ ืœื™ื‘ืจื™ืš ื”ื“ื•ืจ ืืžืจื• ืœื™ื” ื”ื‘ ืœื™ืฉืชื™ ืืžืจ ืœื”ื• ืจื‘ ื™ื™ื‘ื ืกื‘ื ื”ื›ื™ ืืžืจ ืจื‘ ื›ื™ื•ืŸ ื“ืืžืจ ื”ื‘ ืœื™ื‘ืจื™ืš ืื™ืชืกืจ ืœื™ื” ืœืžืฉืชื™ ื—ืžืจื ื”ื›ื ื ืžื™ ื›ื™ื•ืŸ ื“ืื™ื˜ืคืœ ืœื™ื” ืœื›ืกื•ื™ ืื™ื—ื™ื™ื‘ ืœื™ื” ืœื‘ืจื›ื”

As it occurred that Rav Beruna and Rav แธคananel, the students of Rav, were sitting together at a meal, and Rav Yeiva the Elder stood over them to serve them. They said to him: Give us a cup of wine over which to recite the blessings of Grace after Meals. They then changed their mind and said to him: Give us a cup of wine to drink. Rav Yeiva the Elder said to them that this is what Rav said: Once someone at a meal says: Give me a cup over which to recite the blessings of Grace after Meals, it is prohibited for him to drink any more wine, since he has expressed his desire to conclude his meal. If he now wishes to drink more wine, he must recite a blessing before drinking it. Ravina asks: Here too, since he is required to cover the blood of the undomesticated animal before slaughtering the bird, there is an interruption between the acts of slaughter, and he has therefore become obligated to recite a new blessing before slaughtering the bird.

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